leth

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See also: leð, leþ, and leth-

Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *laïθ, borrowed from Latin lac, lactis.

Noun[edit]

leth m

  1. milk

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *letos, perhaps cognate with Latin latus (side), or from Proto-Celtic *ɸletos.[1]

Celtic cognates include Welsh lled (breadth, width, half), Middle Breton let, led (large), and Cornish les.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

leth n (genitive leith or lethe, nominative plural leth or lethe)

  1. half
  2. direction
  3. side

Declension[edit]

Especially in meaning "half":

Neuter o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative lethN lethN lethL
Vocative lethN lethN lethL
Accusative lethN lethN lethL
Genitive leithL leth lethN
Dative leuthL lethaib lethaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Especially in meaning "side":

Neuter s-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative lethN letheN, leitheN letheL, leitheL
Vocative lethN letheN, leitheN letheL, leitheL
Accusative lethN letheN, leitheN letheL, leitheL
Genitive letheH, leitheH letheN, leitheN letheN, leitheN
Dative leithL lethib, leithib lethib, leithib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Descendants[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
leth
also lleth after a proclitic
leth
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
leth
also lleth after a proclitic
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*letos”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-17336-1, pages 238-239
  • leth” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *laiþa-, from Proto-Indo-European *aleit-.

Noun[edit]

lēth n

  1. an evil person or thing

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish leth, from Proto-Celtic *letos, perhaps cognate with Latin latus (side), or from Proto-Celtic *ɸletos.[1]

Celtic cognates include Welsh lled (breadth, width, half), Middle Breton let, led (large), and Cornish les.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

leth

  1. half

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*letos”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-17336-1, pages 238-239
  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, ISBN 0 901771 92 9
  • leth” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.