liber

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See also: Liber, Liber., and libër

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin. See libel.

Noun[edit]

liber ‎(countable and uncountable, plural libers)

  1. (botany) The inner bark of plants, next to the wood. It usually contains a large proportion of woody, fibrous cells, and is the part from which the fibre of the plant is obtained, as that of hemp, etc.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


Czech[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

liber

  1. genitive plural of libra

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

liber

  1. genitive plural of libero

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

liber m ‎(plural libers)

  1. bast (of a tree)
  2. book

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Latin[edit]

Latin Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia la

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *h₁lewdʰ- ‎(people). Cognates include: Ancient Greek ἐλεύθερος ‎(eleútheros), Sanskrit रोधति ‎(rodhati), German Leute, Russian люди ‎(ljudi, people).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

līber m ‎(feminine lībera, neuter līberum, comparative līberior, superlative līberrimus); first/second declension

  1. free, unrestricted
    • Seneca Minor, Epistulae Morales ad Lucilium, Epistula XCII
      Nemo liber est qui corpori servit.
      No one is free who is a slave to his body.
    • Captivi ("the captives") by Plautus (English and Latin text)
      Haud istuc rogo. Fuistin liber? - Fui.
      That isn’t what I’m asking about. Were you a freeman? - I was.
Inflection[edit]

First/second declension, masculine nominative singular in -er.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative līber lībera līberum līberī līberae lībera
genitive līberī līberae līberī līberōrum līberārum līberōrum
dative līberō līberae līberō līberīs līberīs līberīs
accusative līberum līberam līberum līberōs līberās lībera
ablative līberō līberā līberō līberīs līberīs līberīs
vocative līber lībera līberum līberī līberae lībera
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from an older form *luber, from Proto-Indo-European *leup- ‎(to peel, break off). Cognate to Old Church Slavonic лѹбъ ‎(lubŭ, bark of a tree) and Lithuanian lùpti ‎(to peel, to shell).[1] See also English leaf, lobby, lodge, Ancient Greek λέπω ‎(lépō, to peel), λέπος ‎(lépos, peel), λεπτός ‎(leptós, peel).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

liber m ‎(genitive librī); second declension

  1. a book
  2. the inner bark of a tree
Inflection[edit]

Second declension, nominative singular in -er.

Case Singular Plural
nominative liber librī
genitive librī librōrum
dative librō librīs
accusative librum librōs
ablative librō librīs
vocative liber1 librī

1May also be libre.

Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Inflected form of the verb lībo ‎(taste, spill).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

līber

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of lībō

References[edit]

  1. ^ “libro” in: Alberto Nocentini, Alessandro Parenti, “l'Etimologico — Vocabolario della lingua italiana”, Le Monnier, 2010, ISBN 978-88-00-20781-2
  • līber, adj.” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • līber, n.” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin liber, French libre (19th century).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

liber

  1. free, at liberty

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]