lik

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See also: lík and -lik

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lik m ‎(plural likken, diminutive likje n)

  1. lick (a caress with the tongue)
  2. (Netherlands): jail

Verb[edit]

lik

  1. first-person singular present indicative of likken
  2. imperative of likken

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English to like

Verb[edit]

lik

  1. Imperative singular of liken.
  2. (colloquial) First-person singular present of liken.

Greenlandic[edit]

Affix[edit]

lik

  1. Indicating something provides something.
    e.g. Tasiusamik atilik
    A place called Tasiusaq (literally 'provided with the name Tasiusaq').

Livonian[edit]

Verb[edit]

lik

  1. 1st person singular negative form of likkõ
  2. 2nd person singular negative form of likkõ
  3. 3rd person singular negative form of likkõ
  4. 2nd person singular imperative form of likkõ

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

lik

  1. rafsi of litki.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse líkr, alternative spelling of glíkr, from Proto-Germanic *galīkaz.

Adjective[edit]

lik ‎(neuter singular likt, definite singular and plural like, comparative likere, indefinite superlative likest, definite superlative likeste)

  1. similar, alike
  2. equal
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse lík, from Proto-Germanic *līką, from Proto-Indo-European *līg-.

Noun[edit]

lik n ‎(definite singular liket, indefinite plural lik, definite plural lika or likene)

  1. a corpse, (dead) body
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse lík ‎(leech).

Noun[edit]

lik n ‎(definite singular liket, indefinite plural lik, definite plural lika or likene)

  1. edge of a sail; leech

Etymology 4[edit]

Verb[edit]

lik

  1. imperative of like

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse líkr, alternative spelling of glíkr, from Proto-Germanic *galīkaz.

Adjective[edit]

lik ‎(neuter singular likt, definite singular and plural like, comparative likare, indefinite superlative likast, definite superlative likaste)

  1. similar, alike
  2. equal
Antonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse lík, from Proto-Germanic *līką, from Proto-Indo-European *līg-.

Noun[edit]

lik n ‎(definite singular liket, indefinite plural lik, definite plural lika)

  1. a corpse, (dead) body
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse lík ‎(leech).

Noun[edit]

lik n ‎(definite singular liket, indefinite plural lik, definite plural lika)

  1. edge of a sail; leech

References[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *līką, from the root Proto-Indo-European *līg-. Cognate with the Old English līċ, Dutch lijk, Old High German līh (German Leiche), Old Norse lík (Swedish lik), Gothic 𐌻𐌴𐌹𐌺 ‎(leik).

Cognate with Old Saxon gilīk ‎(alike, similar).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

līk n

  1. dead body, corpse
  2. torso

Declension[edit]


Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lík, from Proto-Germanic *līką.

Noun[edit]

līk n

  1. shape, semblance, appearance
  2. corpse

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *likъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /lʲik/

Noun[edit]

lik m inan

  1. (obsolete) quantity, amount, number

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *likъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lȋk m ‎(Cyrillic spelling ли̑к)

  1. form, shape, figure
  2. image, effigy
  3. appearance
  4. (colloquial) guy

Declension[edit]

Derived Terms[edit]

  1. oblik
  2. slika

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Swedish līker, from Old Norse líkr, glíkr, from Proto-Germanic *galīkaz.

Adjective[edit]

lik

  1. like, similar to
  2. like
Declension[edit]
Inflection of lik
Indefinite/attributive Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular lik likare likast
Neuter singular likt likare likast
Plural lika likare likast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 like likare likaste
All lika likare likaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in an attributive role.
Antonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Swedish līk, from Old Norse lík, from Proto-Germanic *līką, from Proto-Indo-European *līg-.

Noun[edit]

lik n

  1. corpse
  2. the edge of a sail, either free or following mast or boom
Declension[edit]

West Flemish[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

lik

  1. like, such as