lockdown

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See also: lock-down and lock down

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the verb phrase lock down.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈlɒkˌdaʊn/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈlɑkˌdaʊn/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

lockdown (countable and uncountable, plural lockdowns)

  1. The confinement of people in their own rooms (e.g. in a school) or cells (in a prison), or to their own homes or areas (e.g. in the case of a city- or nation-wide issue) as a security measure after or amid a disturbance or pandemic, etc.
    • 2020 May 20, Andrew Haines talks to Stefanie Foster, “Repurpose rail for the 2020s”, in Rail, page 29:
      At the time of writing, no decisions had been made by the Government as to when or how lockdown restrictions might begin to be lifted. However, discussions were taking place in the industry about how social distancing could be maintained on the railway if some patronage were to return soon.
  2. (US) A contrivance to fasten logs together in rafting.
    • 1931, State University of Iowa. Bureau of Business Research, Iowa studies in business (issues 10-15, page 24)
      The rafts were made up of strings of logs about seventeen feet wide, held together by poles across them. Each log was pinned to the poles by wooden pegs and lockdowns.

Translations[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: lockdown
  • Icelandic: lokkdán
  • Italian: lockdown

See also[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English lockdown.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɔk.dɑu̯n/, /lɔkˈdɑu̯n/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: lock‧down

Noun[edit]

lockdown m (plural lockdowns)

  1. lockdown (confinement as a security measure)

Derived terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English lockdown.

Noun[edit]

lockdown m (invariable)

  1. (neologism) lockdown