loke

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Loke and Lôĸe

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English loke, from Old English loca (a bar, bolt; enclosure, stronghold), from Proto-Germanic *lukô, *lukǭ (lock, clasp, shutter, opening), from Proto-Indo-European *lewg- (to bend, turn). Cognate with Icelandic loka (clasp, latch, lock, bolt). More at lock.

Noun[edit]

loke (plural lokes)

  1. (UK dialectal) The wicket or hatch of a door.
  2. (UK dialectal) A close narrow lane; a cul-de-sac.
  3. (UK dialectal) A private path or road.
  4. (UK dialectal) A small field or meadow.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A derivative of loc.[1]

Noun[edit]

loke f (indefinite plural loke, definite singular lokja, definite plural loket)

  1. dear, darling

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “loke”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, →ISBN, page 230

Dutch[edit]

Verb[edit]

loke

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of luiken

Anagrams[edit]


Fataluku[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A Papuan word, compare Makasae lo'e.

Verb[edit]

loke

  1. to open

Hawaiian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English rose.

Noun[edit]

loke

  1. (botany) rose

References[edit]

  • Mary Kawena Pukui - Samuel H. Elbert, Hawaiian Dictionary, University of Hawaii Press 1986

Lindu[edit]

Noun[edit]

loke

  1. plug

Mauritian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French hoquet.

Verb[edit]

loke

  1. to hiccup

References[edit]

  • Baker, Philip & Hookoomsing, Vinesh Y. 1987. Dictionnaire de créole mauricien. Morisyen – English – Français

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse loka (to let fall and hang down).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

loke (passive lokes, imperative lok, present tense loker, simple past and past participle loket or loka, present participle lokende, verbal noun loking)

  1. (colloquial) to lurk or wander around aimlessly
    • 1996, Sverre Knudsen, Munn til munn, page 161:
      det var en ny tøffeldrøm. Jeg befant meg på toppen av en forblåst isbre og massevis av folk loka rundt meg i Helly Hansen-dresser
      it was a new slipper dream. I was on top of a windswept glacier and lots of people lurked around me in Helly Hansen suits
    • 2008, Harald Rosenløw Eeg, Løp hare løp:
      vi loker rundt i gatene, i retning høyhusa
      we walk aimlessly around the streets, in the direction of the high-rise buildings
    • 2016, Kyrre Andreassen, For øvrig mener jeg at Karthago bør ødelegges, page 297:
      hun hadde loka bakimellom stuegardinene mens vi holdt på ute i hagen
      she had lurked in the back between the living room curtains while we were out in the garden
    • 2017, chapter 3, in Skam, season 4:
      han har friår. Bare loker rundt som vanlig
      he has a year off. Just wondering around aimlessly as usual

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • lokje (alternative spelling)

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse Loki. Doublet of Loke.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

loke m

  1. (folklore) a mythological being
    Lokje dengjer Bon’e sine.
    Loke beats his children. (when it cracks in burning wood)

Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

loke

  1. inflection of loka (world):
    1. locative singular
    2. accusative plural

Seychellois Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English lock.

Verb[edit]

loke

  1. to lock

References[edit]

  • Danielle D’Offay et Guy Lionnet, Diksyonner Kreol - Franse / Dictionnaire Créole Seychellois - Français
  • Seychelles Creole vocabulary. In: Haspelmath, M. & Tadmor, U. (eds.) World Loanword Database. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.

Tetum[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A Papuan word, compare Fataluku loke.

Verb[edit]

loke

  1. to open