lon

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Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unknown. Compare Arabic عَلَم(ʿalam). The standard Albanian equivalent is flamur.

Noun[edit]

lon m

  1. (Arbëresh) flag

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish lon.

Noun[edit]

lon m (genitive singular loin, nominative plural lonta)

  1. blackbird (Turdus merula)

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse lón. Akin to Icelandic lón.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lon f (definite singular lona, indefinite plural loner, definite plural lonene)

  1. a depression in the bottom of a river or creek
    Synonym: høl
  2. a portion of a creek with slow-flowing water

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lon m

  1. blackbird

Inflection[edit]

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative lon lonL luinL
Vocative luin lonL lunuH
Accusative lonN lonL lunuH
Genitive luinL lon lonN
Dative lunL lonaib lonaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: lon, lon dubh
  • Manx: lhondoo, lhonnag
  • Scottish Gaelic: lon, lon-dubh

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
lon
also llon after a proclitic
lon
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Romani[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Sanskrit लवण (lavaṇa). Compare Hindi लोन (lon, salt) and Punjabi ਲੂਣ (lūṇ, salt)

Noun[edit]

lon m

  1. salt

References[edit]

  • Yaron Matras (2002), “Historical and linguistic origins”, in Romani: A Linguistic Introduction[1], Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 40

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Loin anns an t-Saoghal Ùr

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Irish lon. Compare Irish lon. Cognate with Old Church Slavonic лань (lanĭ, hind) and also related to Proto-Celtic *elantī (doe, hind) (whence eilid (hind)).

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /ɫ̪ɔn/

Noun[edit]

lon m (genitive singular loin, plural loin)

  1. moose
  2. elk

Etymology 2[edit]

Apparently a condensation of lomhainn from St Kilda.

Noun[edit]

lon m (genitive singular loin, plural lonan)

  1. a rope of raw hides

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle Irish lon, from Old Irish lon.

Noun[edit]

lon m (genitive singular loin, plural loin)

  1. blackbird (Turdus merula)
  2. ouzel (Cinclus mexicanus)

Etymology 4[edit]

Shortening of lon-chraois, apparently from Middle Irish con cráis (gluttony). Kuno Keyer translates lon separately as "demon". Others suggest lon as "water". See craos for its etymology.

Noun[edit]

lon m (genitive singular loin, no plural)

  1. insatiable hunger
  2. unquenchable thirst
  3. gluttony
  4. voracity

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English run.

Verb[edit]

lon

  1. to run

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

lon

  1. definite singular of lo

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

(classifier cái) lon (, 𨫅)

  1. beverage can

Etymology 2[edit]

From French galon.

Noun[edit]

lon

  1. (military, informal) stripe
Derived terms[edit]

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin longe, from the adjective longus (long, far-off).

Adverb[edit]

lon

  1. far

Antonyms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lon

  1. Soft mutation of llon.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
llon lon unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.