loot

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See also: Loot and loot-

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Middle Dutch loet or loete (scoop, shovel, scraper), from reconstructed Old Dutch *lōta, from Old Frankish *lōtija (scoop), from Proto-Germanic *hlōþþijō (scoop), from Proto-Indo-European *kleh₂- (to lay down, deposit, overlay).

Related to lade and ladle, and cognate with Dutch loet, Scots lute or luyt (scoop), West Frisian loete or lete, Middle Low German lōte (rake), and French louche (ladle).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

loot (plural loots)

  1. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) A scoop used to remove scum from brine pans in saltworks.

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Hindi लूट (lūṭ, booty), either from Sanskrit लोप्त्र (loptra, booty, stolen property) or लुण्ट् (luṇṭ, to rob, plunder). The figurative meaning developed in American English in the 1920s, resulting in a generalized meaning by the 1950s.

Noun[edit]

loot (uncountable)

  1. Synonym of booty, goods seized from an enemy by violence, particularly (historical) during the sacking of a town in war or (video games) after successful combat.
    • 1788, Indian Vocabulary, p. 77:
      Loot, plunder, pillage.
    • 1839, Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 45, p. 104:
      He always found the talismanic gathering-word Loot (plunder), a sufficient bond of union in any part of India.
    • 1860, William Howard Russell, My Diary in India in the Year 1858–9, Vol. II, p. 340:
      Why, the race [of camp followers] is suckled on loot, fed on theft, swaddled in plunder, and weaned on robbery.
    • 1862, Walter F. Hook, Lives of the Archbishops of Canterbury, Vol. II, p. 505:
      The horses in the archbishop's stables the murderers appropriated as their own fee,—or, as we should now say, as loot.
    • 2015, Shashi Tharoor, "Britain Does Owe Reparations", 00:02:22:
      India went from being a world-famous exporter of finished cloth into an importer, went from having 27% of world trade to less than 2%. Meanwhile, colonialists like Sir Robert Clive bought their rotten boroughs in England on the proceeds of their loot in India while taking the Hindi word "loot" into their dictionaries as well as their habits.
    The loot from the sack of Constantinople included the head of John the Baptist.
  2. Synonym of sack, the plundering of a city, particularly during war.
    He consented to the loot of the city by the men under his command.
  3. (colloquial, US) Any valuable thing received for free, especially Christmas presents.
    • 1956 April 23, Life Magazine, p. 131:
      Free Loot for Children
  4. (slang) Synonym of money.
    • 1943, John Leslie Hunt & al., Service Slang, p. 44:
      Loot, Scottish slang for money received on pay day.
    • 1956, Billie Holiday & al., Lady Sings the Blues, p. 26:
      There was nothing to do except for Mom to go back slaving away as somebody's maid. In Baltimore she couldn't make half the loot she could up North.
    • 2019 July 3, Mike D'Angelo, “Oscar Isaac and Ben Affleck Blunder through a Heavy Heist in J.C. Chandor’s Triple Frontier”, in AV Club[1]:
      Movies and TV were [] continuing to pretend for many years that the contents of a single briefcase could purchase a small country. Lately, though, filmmakers have made some sincere efforts to be realistic about the sheer bulk of pilfered loot)
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

loot (third-person singular simple present loots, present participle looting, simple past and past participle looted)

  1. (transitive) Synonym of plunder, to seize by violence particularly during the capture of a city during war or (video games) after successful combat.
    • 1833, The Asiatic Journal & Monthly Register for British India & Its Dependencies, p. 66:
      Gunganarian, the leader of the Chooars, continues his system of looting and murder
    • 1842 May 17, Lord Ellenborough, letter:
      The plunderers are beaten whenever they are caught, but there is a good deal of burning and ‘looting’ as they call it.
    • 1901 October 11, “District Reports”, in The Agricultural Journal and Mining Record[2], volume 4, number 16, page 483:
      On the 22nd ultimo the Boers made a raid into the District, and the result was that some 300 head of cattle and 600 sheep were looted.
    We looted the temple and the orphanage, which turned most of the NPCs against us.
  2. (transitive, chiefly South Asian) Synonym of rob, to steal something from someone by violence or threat of violence.
    • 1851 June 20, Mrs. Hervey, journal:
      He told me... that if I gave him less than to the master of the luggage-boat, he would... declare at Shēr-Gurry that I had ‘looted him!’
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Clipping.

Noun[edit]

loot (plural loots)

  1. (US military slang, dated) Clipping of lieutenant.
    • 1898, Finley Peter Dunne, Mr. Dooley in Peace & War, p. 11:
      R-run over an' wake up th' loot at th' station.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch lote, from Old Dutch *lōt, from Proto-Germanic *lōda, related to *landa- and *leudaną (to grow, sprout, shoot up).

Noun[edit]

loot m (plural loten, diminutive lootje n)

  1. A sprout, shoot, stem etc. growing on an existing plant part
    Synonym: scheut
  2. A descendant, offspring.
  3. Something originating, growing, developing from another.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

loot

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of loten
  2. imperative of loten

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *lōt, from Proto-West Germanic *laud.

Noun[edit]

lôot n

  1. lead (metal)
    Synonym: bli

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: lood
  • Limburgish: loead

Further reading[edit]