luft

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See also: Luft

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Luft (air). Doublet of lift and loft.

Noun[edit]

luft (uncountable)

  1. (chess) Space made for a castled king to give it a flight square to prevent a back-rank mate.

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Luft.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

luft m

  1. (informal) air
    Synonym: vzduch

Further reading[edit]

  • luft in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • luft in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German luft, lucht (air, smell), from Old Saxon luft, from Proto-West Germanic *luftu. Probably influenced by German Luft (air). It is a cognate of Danish loft (attic) and Danish lugt (smell).

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): [ˈlɔfd]

Noun[edit]

luft c (definite singular luften) (uncountable)

  1. air

Derived terms[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German lucht, from Old Saxon luft, from Proto-West Germanic *luftu.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

luft f (genitive singular luftar, uncountable)

  1. air
  2. atmosphere, sky

Declension[edit]

Declension of luft (singular only)
f2s singular
indefinite definite
nominative luft luftin
accusative luft luftina
dative luft luftini
genitive luftar luftarinnar

Related terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English lyft (air, atmosphere, firmament), from Proto-West Germanic *luftu, from Proto-Germanic *luftuz (air, upper region). More at lift.

Noun[edit]

lüft

  1. air
  2. atmosphere
  3. heavens, sky, firmament

Descendants[edit]

  • English: lift (the sky, atmosphere)
  • Scots: lift, luft

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Noun[edit]

luft f or m (definite singular lufta or luften, uncountable)

  1. air

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German lucht.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

luft f (definite singular lufta, uncountable)

  1. air

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Frisian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *luftu, from Proto-Germanic *luftuz (air, upper region).

Noun[edit]

luft

  1. air
  2. the sky

Descendants[edit]

  • North Frisian: loft (the sky)

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Luft, from Middle High German luft, from Old High German luft, from Proto-West Germanic *luftu, from Proto-Germanic *luftuz.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /luft/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uft
  • Syllabification: luft

Noun[edit]

luft m inan

  1. (archaic) pipe in a stove, chimney, or kitchen that carries away smoke
  2. (Upper Silesia, Poznań colloquial) air, air supply
    Synonym: powietrze

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective

Further reading[edit]

  • luft in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • luft in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English luft, lufte, from Old English lyft (the lower sky (as opposed to the upper atmosphere, or heavens), air, atmosphere), from Proto-West Germanic *luftu, from Proto-Germanic *luftuz.

Noun[edit]

luft (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of lift.
    • 1898, David Hay Fleming, Mary Queen of Scots (in English), page 437:
      Bothwell told Sir James Melville that he saw the strangest accident that ever chancit, to wit the powder cam out of the luft [i.e. the sky], and had brunt the Kingis house, and himself found lying dead a litle distance from the house under a tre;
    • 1977, Douglas Young, ‎Clara Young, ‎David D. Murison, A Clear Voice: Douglas Young, Poet and Polymath (in English), page 39:
      Gesserant sails on a skinklan frith, gowd-yalla luft and blue o the sea
    • 1996, Review of Scottish Culture - Issues 10-12 (in English), page 101:
      [] kind of phonetic spelling which resembles Elphinston's recommendations for an orthographic reform as issued in the eighteenth century, so his proverbs and sayings have to be practically translated: Gin dhe luft wuz tay faw, dhe laivruks wud bee smuird – if the sky were to fall, the larks would be smothered.

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Luft.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lȕft m (Cyrillic spelling лу̏фт)

  1. (colloquial) air
    Synonyms: vàzdūh, zrȃk

References[edit]

  • luft” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Silesian[edit]

Silesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia szl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Luft.

Noun[edit]

luft

  1. air
    Synonym: (Texas) wjater

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German Luft.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

luft c

  1. air, atmosphere

Declension[edit]

Declension of luft 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative luft luften
Genitive lufts luftens

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]