lugger

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌɡə(ɹ)

Etymology 1[edit]

Composed in English of lug +‎ -er. Attested since the early 17th century.[1]

Noun[edit]

lugger (plural luggers)

  1. That which lugs in either literal or figurative senses.
    • 2015, Garry Allison, Southern Hoofprints[2], page 450:
      The horse was a lugger – lugging into the rail all the time. I had to fight hard to keep him running straight
  2. One who lugs, especially one whose job entails pulling or moving heavy objects.
    • 1999, Ontario labor relations board, Labour Relations Board Reports, page 693:
      Robert Taillon, a lugger at Rapid, testified that in December 1997, Carlos Diaz and Michel Labrosse began to train Rene Delage as a lugger for the large transformers.
  3. (slang, Australia, US) A conman. [from 20th century][2]

Etymology 2[edit]

Likely from lugsail,[3], but compare also Middle Dutch luggen (to fish with a dragnet).[4]

Noun[edit]

lugger (plural luggers)

  1. A small vessel having two or three masts, and a running bowsprit, and carrying lugsails.
    • 1899, Kate Chopin, The Awakening:
      A good many persons of the pension had gone over to the Cheniere Caminada in Beaudelet's lugger to hear mass.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Variant of laggar falcon, from Hindi लग्गर (laggar).

Noun[edit]

lugger (plural luggers)

  1. An Indian falcon (Falco jugger), similar to the European lanner and the American prairie falcon.
    • 2013, Conor Mark Jameson, Silent Spring Revisted[3], page 11:
      Falconry is a difficult art to master, some species more so than others. Sakers and Luggers are known to be problematic, and easy to lose, or to lose patience with.

References[edit]

  1. ^ lugger, n.1, in Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.
  2. ^ Jonathon Green (2019), “lugger, n.3”, in Green's Dictionary of Slang[1]
  3. ^ lugger” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.
  4. ^ lugger, n.2, in Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

lugger c (singular definite luggeren, plural indefinite luggere)

A schematic lugger
  1. lugger

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English lugger

Noun[edit]

lugger m (definite singular luggeren, indefinite plural luggere, definite plural luggerne)

  1. (nautical) a lugger

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English lugger

Noun[edit]

lugger m (definite singular luggeren, indefinite plural luggerar, definite plural luggerane)

  1. (nautical) a lugger

References[edit]