lust

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Old English lust ‎(lust, pleasure, longing), from Proto-Germanic *lustuz. Akin to Old Saxon, Dutch lust, Old Frisian, Old High German, German Lust, & Swedish lust, Danish lyst & Icelandic lyst, Old Norse losti, Gothic lustus, and perhaps to Sanskrit lush "to desire" and Albanian lushë ‎(bitch, savage dog, promiscuous woman), or to English loose. Confer list ‎(to please), listless.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lust ‎(countable and uncountable, plural lusts)

  1. A feeling of strong desire, especially of a sexual nature.
    Seeing Kim fills me with a passionate lust.
  2. (archaic) A general want or longing, not necessarily sexual.
    The boarders hide their lust to go home.
    • Spenser
      For little lust had she to talk of aught.
    • Bishop Hall
      My lust to devotion is little.
  3. (archaic) A delightful cause of joy, pleasure.
    An ideal son is his father's lasting lust.
  4. (obsolete) virility; vigour; active power
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

lust ‎(third-person singular simple present lusts, present participle lusting, simple past and past participle lusted)

  1. (intransitive, usually in the phrase "lust after") To look at with a strong desire, especially of a sexual nature.
    He was lusting after the woman in the tight leather miniskirt.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch, from Old Dutch *lust, from Proto-Germanic *lustuz. Compare West Frisian lust, German Lust, English lust.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lust c ‎(plural lusten, diminutive lustje n)

  1. lust, desire (especially sexual)
  2. pleasure, joy
    Het was een lust om naar hem te kijken en te luisteren.
    It was a pleasure watching and listening to him.
  3. benefit, advantage

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

lust

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of lusten
  2. imperative of lusten

Old English[edit]

Noun[edit]

lust m

  1. desire, pleasure, appetite, lust
    Him wæs metes micel lust: he had a craving for food. (Ælfric's Homilies)

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse losti (late Old Norse lyst), from Middle Low German lust lüst, lyst, from Old Saxon lust, from Proto-Germanic *lustuz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lust c

  1. (uncountable) lust (a mood of desire), joy, a keen interest
    jag har ingen lust att läsa idag
    I don't feel like reading today
  2. a desire (for something specific)

Declension[edit]

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