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Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish .

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

(conjunctive and disjunctive)

  1. I, me
    anseo. ― I am here.
    Feiceann sé . ― He sees me.

See also[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin māius.

Noun[edit]

 m (plural més)

  1. May (month)

Norman[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French mei, mi (me), from Latin (me), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-, *(e)me-n- (me).

Pronoun[edit]

  1. (Guernsey) me

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French mer, from Latin mare, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Norman Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nrf

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

 f (plural mers)

  1. (Jersey, continental Normandy, geography) sea
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *mī, from Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-, *(e)me-n- (me) (compare Sanskrit मा (), Greek με (me), Latin , Welsh mi).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

  1. I
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 5b17
      Is as apstal geinte.
      It is I who am the apostle of the gentiles.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish:
  • Scottish Gaelic: mi
  • Manx: mee

Venetian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

(possesive)

  1. mine