medeor

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *medēōr, from Proto-Indo-European *med- ‎(to measure, give advice, heal). Compare Avestan [script needed] ‎(vī-mad), Old Persian [script needed] ‎(azdā), Old Armenian միտ ‎(mit), Old Irish midiur, Gothic 𐌼𐌹𐍄𐌰𐌸𐍃 ‎(mitaþs), Ancient Greek μέδομαι ‎(médomai), German Maut.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

medeor ‎(present infinitive medērī); second conjugation, deponent, no perfect

  1. I heal, cure, remedy, am good for or against a disease.
  2. (figuratively) I amend, correct, relieve.

Inflection[edit]

  • Second conjugation, but with no perfect conjugation or future participle and infinitive.
   Conjugation of medeor (second conjugation, deponent, defective)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present medeor medēris, medēre medētur medēmur medēminī medentur
imperfect medēbar medēbāris, medēbāre medēbātur medēbāmur medēbāminī medēbantur
future medēbor medēberis, medēbere medēbitur medēbimur medēbiminī medēbuntur
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present medear medeāris, medeāre medeātur medeāmur medeāminī medeantur
imperfect medērer medērēris, medērēre medērētur medērēmur medērēminī medērentur
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present medēre medēminī
future medētor medētor medentor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives medērī
participles medēns medendus
verbal nouns gerund supine
nominative genitive dative/ablative accusative accusative ablative
medēre medendī medendō medendum

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • medeor” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.