medley

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Medley

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English medle, from Anglo-Norman medlee, Old French medlee, from Late Latin misculata, feminine past participle of Vulgar Latin *misculō (to mix). Compare meddle. Doublet of melee.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmɛdli/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

medley (plural medleys)

  1. (now rare, archaic) Combat, fighting; a battle. [from 14thc.]
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter lxxj, in Le Morte Darthur, book X:
      Thenne came the kyng of Irland and the kynge of the stryete marches to rescowe syre Tristram and sire Palomydes / There beganne a grete medle / & many knyghtes were smyten doune on bothe partyes / and alweyes sir launcelot spared sir Tristram / and he spared hym
    • 1632, Xenophon, Philemon Holland (translator), Cyrupaedia
      For greater shields they have, than that they can either doe or see ought, and being raunged by hundreds no doubt they will hinder one another in the medley, except some very few
  2. A collection or mixture of miscellaneous things. [from 17thc.]
    a fruit medley
    • 1713, Joseph Addison, Cato, published 1712, [Act 2, scene 6]:
      this medley of philosophy and war
    • 1692, William Walsh, Letters and Poems, Amorous and Gallant
      Love is a medley of endearments, jars, / Suspicions, reconcilements, wars.
  3. (music) A collection of related songs played or mixed together as a single piece. [from 17thc.]
    They played a medley of favorite folk songs as an encore.
  4. (swimming) A competitive swimming event that combines the four strokes of butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke, and freestyle. [from 20th c.]
  5. A cloth of mixed colours.
    • 1631, Thomas Fuller, Comment on Ruth , Chapter 1, verses 9, 10, 11
      Otherwise , as our Saviour noteth , when the old Cloth was joyned to the new , it made no good medley , but the Rent was made the wors

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

medley (third-person singular simple present medleys, present participle medleying, simple past and past participle medleyed)

  1. (music) To combine, to form a medley.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English medley.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /mɛdli/, [ˈmɛd̥li]

Noun[edit]

medley n (singular definite medleyet, plural indefinite medleyer)

  1. medley (of songs; swimming event)
    Carola sang et medley af "Fame" og "Flashdance" ved koncerten.
    Carola sang a medley of "Fame" and "Flashdance" at the concert.

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English medley.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: med‧ley

Noun[edit]

medley m (plural medleys, diminutive medleytje n)

  1. several songs strung together.

Synonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English medley. Doublet of mezclada.

Noun[edit]

medley m (plural medleys)

  1. medley (songs)

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English medley.

Noun[edit]

medley n

  1. medley (songs)