mesa

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See also: Mesa, mésá, mesá, mėsa, and meša

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested 1759, from Spanish mesa (table), from Latin mēnsa. Doublet of mensa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) enPR: māʹsə, IPA(key): /ˈmeɪ.sə/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪsə

Noun[edit]

mesa (plural mesas)

  1. Flat area of land or plateau higher than other land, with one or more clifflike edges.
    Coordinate term: butte
    Hyponyms: potrero, tuya
    A few more miles of hot sand and gravel and red stone brought us around a low mesa to the Little Colorado River.
    • 2013 November 27, John Grotzinger, “The world of Mars [print version: International Herald Tribune Magazine, 2013, p. 36]”, in The New York Times[1]:
      Those multitoned buttes and mesas [of the Grand Canyon], and that incandescent sequence of colorful bands that make one of the natural wonders of the world so grand, can also be found over 100 million miles away [on Mars].

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mēnsa.

Noun[edit]

mesa f (plural mesas)

  1. table

References[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmesa/, [ˈme.sa]
  • Hyphenation: me‧sa

Noun[edit]

mesa f (plural meses)

  1. table

Chamicuro[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish mesa, from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table

Chavacano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish mesa (table), from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table

Eastern Huasteca Nahuatl[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish mesa, from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table

French[edit]

Noun[edit]

mesa f (plural mesas)

  1. mesa

Further reading[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese mesa (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mesa f (plural mesas)

  1. table
    • 1707, Salvador Francisco Roel,
      E pois eu doze perdizes,
      e de polos ducia e media
      lle hei de lebar se Deus quer,
      e se podo vnha Tenreyra,
      por ser prato regalado
      que se estima en calquer mesa.
      Then I twelve partridges
      and a dozen and a half chickens
      I ought to take, God willing,
      and if I can a calf [veal]
      because it is a delightful dish
      that is appreciated in any table.
  2. all items set on a table for a meal
  3. board; directors of an organization
  4. stall, stand
    Synonym: trabanca
  5. bed of a cart
  6. stool
    Synonyms: banqueta, meso, tallo
  7. bench
    Synonym: banco

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  • mesa” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • mesa” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • mesa” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • mesa” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • mesa” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

mēsa

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐌴𐍃𐌰

Hausa[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /méː.sàː/
    • (Standard Kano Hausa) IPA(key): [méː.sàː]

Noun[edit]

mēsā̀ f (plural mēsōshī, possessed form mēsàr̃)

  1. python
  2. rubber hose

Highland Popoluca[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish mesa, from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table

References[edit]

  • Elson, Benjamin F.; Gutiérrez G., Donaciano (1999) Diccionario popoluca de la Sierra, Veracruz (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 41)‎[2] (in Spanish), Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., →ISBN, page 83

Kituba[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish mesa or Portuguese mesa, from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From mensa, with regular loss of /n/ before /s/, along with compensatory lengthening of the preceding vowel.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mēsa f (genitive mēsae); first declension

  1. (Late Latin, proscribed) Alternative form of mēnsa ("table").
    • 3rd–4th century C.E., Appendix Probi:
      mensa non mesa
      [Say or write] mensa, not mesa.

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mēsa mēsae
Genitive mēsae mēsārum
Dative mēsae mēsīs
Accusative mēsam mēsās
Ablative mēsā mēsīs
Vocative mēsa mēsae

Descendants[edit]

  • Balkan Romance:
    • Aromanian: measã
    • Romanian: masă (see there for further descendants)
  • Dalmatian:
  • Rhaeto-Romance:
  • Northern Gallo-Romance:
  • Southern Gallo-Romance:
  • Ibero-Romance:
    • Aragonese: mesa
    • Asturian: mesa
    • Portuguese: mesa (see there for further descendants)
    • Spanish: mesa (see there for further descendants)
  • Sardinian:
  • Borrowings:

Latvian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin missa.

Noun[edit]

mesa f (4 declension)

  1. (Christianity) mass

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Luo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Swahili meza.

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table
    Welo bet e mesa kae to ji chako chiemo.
    The meal begins, with the guests reclining at the table.

Maquiritari[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish mesa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table

References[edit]

  • Hall, Katherine Lee (1988), “mesa”, in The morphosyntax of discourse in De'kwana Carib, volume I and II, Saint Louis, Missouri: PhD Thesis, Washington University
  • Hall, Katherine (2007), “mesai”, in Mary Ritchie Key & Bernard Comrie, editors, The Intercontinental Dictionary Series[3], Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, published 2021

Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From metre.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mesa f (plural mesas)

  1. placement, placing

Verb[edit]

mesa

  1. feminine singular of the past participle of metre

Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

mesa m

  1. ram

Declension[edit]


Papiamentu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese mesa and Spanish mesa and Kabuverdianu meza.

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
mesa

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese mesa (table), from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa (table). Cognate with Galician mesa, Spanish mesa, French moise, Italian mensa and Romanian masă.

Not related to Persian میز(mēz, table). As both it and Portuguese mesa have been borrowed into different languages of southern Asia, they are sometimes confused by etymologists.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈme.zɐ/, [ˈme.zɐ]

  • (Northeast Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈme.za/
  • Hyphenation: me‧sa

Noun[edit]

mesa f (plural mesas)

  1. table (item of furniture)
    José, põe a mesa, por favor.
    José, please set the table.
    • 2015, Neil Gaiman, Os filhos de Anansi, Editora Intrinseca, →ISBN, page 6:
      Cumprimentou-as tocando a aba do chapéu — pois ele usava chapéu, um fedora verde imaculado, além de luvas cor de lima —, e em seguida caminhou até a mesa onde estavam as mulheres, que deram risada.
      He greeted them by touching the brim of his hat – for he wore a hat, an immaculate green fedora, and lime-colored gloves – and then walked to the table where the women were, who gave a laugh.
  2. meal, food
    Portugal tem boa mesa e bom vinho.
    Portugal has good food and good wine.
  3. (geography) mesa
  4. board (committee)

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:mesa.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • mesa” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Rwanda-Rundi[edit]

Verb[edit]

-mesa (infinitive kumesa, perfective -meshe)

  1. wash clothing, launder

Sardinian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mesa f (plural mesas)

  1. table

Spanish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmesa/, [ˈme.sa]
  • Hyphenation: me‧sa

Noun[edit]

mesa f (plural mesas)

  1. table
  2. (by extension) dinner table
  3. mesa
  4. desk (in an office)
  5. bureau, committee
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Chavacano: mesa
  • Cebuano: lamesa
  • Chamicuro: mesa
  • English: mesa
  • Eastern Huasteca Nahuatl: mesa
  • Higaonon: lamesa
  • Highland Popoluca: mesa
  • Kituba: mesa
  • O'odham: miːsa
  • Tagalog: mesa, lamesa
  • Zacatlán-Ahuacatlán-Tepetzintla Nahuatl: mesa
  • Zoogocho Zapotec: mes

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

mesa

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of mesar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of mesar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of mesar.

Further reading[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish mesa (table), from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmesa/, [ˈmesɐ]
  • Hyphenation: me‧sa

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table

Synonyms[edit]

  • lamesa (often used interchangeably with mesa)

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From mes (acorns) +‎ -a. Cognate with Cornish mesa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mesa (first-person singular present mesaf)

  1. to gather acorns

Conjugation[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
mesa fesa unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “mesa”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Zacatlán-Ahuacatlán-Tepetzintla Nahuatl[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish mesa, from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa. Compare Highland Puebla Nahuatl me̱saj, Tetelcingo Nahuatl miesa.

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. Table.

References[edit]

  • Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C. (2006), “Tlen ticuih itich in cocina”, in Pequeño diccionario ilustrado: Náhuatl de los municipios de Zacatlán, Tepetzintla y Ahuacatlán[4], segunda edición edition, Tlalpan, D.F. México: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 16