mesa

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See also: Mesa, mésá, mesá, mėsa, and meša

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested 1759, from Spanish mesa (table), from Latin mēnsa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mesa (plural mesas)

  1. Flat area of land or plateau higher than other land, with one or more clifflike edges.
    Coordinate term: butte
    Hyponyms: potrero, tuya
    A few more miles of hot sand and gravel and red stone brought us around a low mesa to the Little Colorado River.
    • 2013 November 27, John Grotzinger, “The world of Mars [print version: International Herald Tribune Magazine, 2013, p. 36]”, in The New York Times[1]:
      Those multitoned buttes and mesas [of the Grand Canyon], and that incandescent sequence of colorful bands that make one of the natural wonders of the world so grand, can also be found over 100 million miles away [on Mars].

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mēnsa.

Noun[edit]

mesa f (plural mesas)

  1. table

References[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈme.sa]
  • Hyphenation: me‧sa

Noun[edit]

mesa f (plural meses)

  1. table

Chamicuro[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish mesa.

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table

Chavacano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish mesa (table).

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table

Eastern Huasteca Nahuatl[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish mesa

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese mesa, from Vulgar Latin mēsa from Latin mēnsa.

Noun[edit]

mesa f (plural mesas)

  1. table
  2. all items set on a table for a meal
  3. board; directors of an organization

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

mēsa

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐌴𐍃𐌰

Hausa[edit]

Noun[edit]

mēsā̀ f (plural mēsōshī, possessed form mēsàr̃)

  1. python
  2. rubber hose

Highland Popoluca[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish mesa.

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table

References[edit]

  • Elson, Benjamin F.; Gutiérrez G., Donaciano (1999) Diccionario popoluca de la Sierra, Veracruz (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 41)‎[2] (in Spanish), Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., →ISBN, page 83

Kituba[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish mesa or Portuguese mesa.

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From mēnsa, which underwent elision. This term is attested in the Appendix Probi[1], a compilation of common mistakes written in the Late Antiquity.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mēsa f (genitive mēsae); first declension

  1. (Vulgar Latin) Alternative form of mēnsa ("table").
    • 3rd–4th century CE, Appendix Probi:
      mēnsa non mēsa
      [Use] mēnsa, not mēsa.

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mēsa mēsae
Genitive mēsae mēsārum
Dative mēsae mēsīs
Accusative mēsam mēsās
Ablative mēsā mēsīs
Vocative mēsa mēsae

First declension.

Italo-Western declension of *mēsa
Number Singular Plural
nominative *mẹ́sa *mẹ́sę
genitive *mẹ́sę *mẹsárọ
dative *mẹ́sę *mẹ́sis
accusative-ablative *mẹ́sã *mẹ́sas
Eastern declension of *mēsa
Number Singular Plural
nominative *mẹ́sa *mẹ́sę
genitive *mẹ́sę *mẹsáru
dative *mẹ́sę *mẹ́sis
accusative-ablative *mẹ́sã *mẹ́sas
Sardinian declension of *mēsa
Number Singular Plural
nominative *mésa *mésę
genitive *mésę *mesáru
dative *mésę *mésis
accusative-ablative *mésã *mésas

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Latvian[edit]

Noun[edit]

mesa f (4 declension)

  1. (Christianity) mass

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

mesa m

  1. ram

Declension[edit]


Papiamentu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese mesa and Spanish mesa and Kabuverdianu meza.

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt
mesa

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese mesa (table), from Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa (table).

Cognate with Galician mesa, Spanish mesa, French moise, Italian mensa and Romanian masă.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mesa f (plural mesas)

  1. table (item of furniture)
    José, põe a mesa, por favor.
    José, please set the table.
    • 2015, Neil Gaiman, Os filhos de Anansi, Editora Intrinseca, →ISBN, page 6:
      Cumprimentou-as tocando a aba do chapéu — pois ele usava chapéu, um fedora verde imaculado, além de luvas cor de lima —, e em seguida caminhou até a mesa onde estavam as mulheres, que deram risada.
      He greeted them by touching the brim of his hat – for he wore a hat, an immaculate green fedora, and lime-colored gloves – and then walked to the table where the women were, who gave a laugh.
  2. meal, food
    Portugal tem boa mesa e bom vinho.
    Portugal has good food and good wine.
  3. (geography) mesa
  4. board (committee)

Quotations[edit]

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:mesa.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • mesa” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin mēsa, from Latin mēnsa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmesa/
  • Hyphenation: me‧sa

Noun[edit]

mesa f (plural mesas)

  1. table
  2. mesa

Derived terms[edit]

(diminutive mesilla or mesita)

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • O'odham: miːsa
  • Zoogocho Zapotec: mes

Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish mesa (table).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /mɛsa/
  • Hyphenation: me‧sa

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. table

Synonyms[edit]

  • lamesa (often used interchangeably with mesa)

Zacatlán-Ahuacatlán-Tepetzintla Nahuatl[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish mesa, from Latin mensa. Compare Highland Puebla Nahuatl me̱saj, Tetelcingo Nahuatl miesa.

Noun[edit]

mesa

  1. Table.

References[edit]

  • Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C. (2006), “Tlen ticuih itich in cocina”, in Pequeño diccionario ilustrado: Náhuatl de los municipios de Zacatlán, Tepetzintla y Ahuacatlán[3], segunda edición edition, Tlalpan, D.F. México: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 16