mizzle

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English misellen ‎(to drizzle). Cognate with Low German musseln ‎(to mizzle), Dutch miezelen ‎(to drizzle, rain gently). Of obscure origin, but apparently related to Middle Low German mes ‎(urine), Middle Dutch mes, mis ‎(urine), both from Old Saxon mehs ‎(urine), from Proto-Germanic *mihstuz, *mihstaz, *mihsk- ‎(urine), from Proto-Germanic *mīganą ‎(to urinate), from Proto-Indo-European *meiǵʰ-, *omeiǵʰ- ‎(to urinate). Compare also English micturate ‎(to urinate), Old Frisian mese ‎(urine), Low German miegen ‎(to urinate), Dutch mijgen ‎(to urinate), Danish mige ‎(to urinate).

Verb[edit]

mizzle ‎(third-person singular simple present mizzles, present participle mizzling, simple past and past participle mizzled)

  1. (intransitive, now regional, UK, Canada, US) To rain in very fine drops.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (rain in very fine drops): drizzle
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

mizzle ‎(uncountable)

  1. misty rain or drizzle
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown. Perhaps from Shelta mi(e)sli ‎(go).[1][2]

Verb[edit]

mizzle ‎(third-person singular simple present mizzles, present participle mizzling, simple past and past participle mizzled)

  1. (chiefly UK) To abscond, scram, flee.
    • 19th c. Epigram quoted by Thomas Wright (1810 - 1877), reproduced in Webster 1902-1913:
      As long as George IV could reign, he reigned, and then he mizzled.
    • 1850, Charles Dickens, David Copperfield [1]
      “Now you may mizzle, Jemmy (as we say at Court), and if Mr. Copperfield will take the chair I’ll operate on him.”
    • 1986, Joan Aiken, Dido and Pa [2]
      “Now you better mizzle,” Dido told him. “Get back to your own quarters, fast.”

References[edit]

  1. ^ An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English (ISBN 0486122867)
  2. ^ Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang (ISBN 0199232059)