moisture

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English moisture, from Old French moistour (moisture, dampness, wetness). Compare French moiteur.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

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moisture (usually uncountable, plural moistures)

  1. That which moistens or makes damp or wet; exuding fluid; liquid in small quantity.
    drops / beads of moisture
  2. The state of being moist.
    Synonyms: dampness, humidity, wetness
    • 1631, Francis [Bacon], “4. Century.”, in Sylua Syluarum: Or A Naturall Historie. In Ten Centuries. [], 3rd edition, London: [] VVilliam Rawley; [p]rinted by J[ohn] H[aviland] for William Lee [], page 84, OCLC 1044372886:
      [] all Exclusion of Open Aire, (which is euer Predatory) maintaineth the Body in his first Freshnesse, and Moisture:
    • 1643, John Denham, Coopers Hill, p. 7,[2]
      Such was the discord, which did first disperse
      Forme, order, beauty through the universe;
      While drynesse moisture, coldnesse heat resists,
      All that we have, and that we are subsists:
    • 1794, Erasmus Darwin, Zoonomia, London: J. Johnson, Volume 1, Section 7, I.1, p. 39,[3]
      [The organs of touch are excited] by the unceasing variations of the heat, moisture, and pressure of the atmosphere;
  3. (medicine) Skin moisture noted as dry, moist, clammy, or diaphoretic as part of the skin signs assessment.

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Old French moistour; equivalent to moiste +‎ -ure.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔi̯stiu̯r(ə)/, /ˈmɔi̯stur(ə)/, /ˈmɔi̯stər(ə)/

Noun[edit]

moisture

  1. moistness, wetness
  2. moisture, humidity
  3. fluid, secretion
  4. (figuratively) Something invigorating.

Usage notes[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: moisture

References[edit]