mong

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See also: móng, mống, mỗng, mỏng, 'mong, and Mong.

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English gemong (mingling) (whence Modern English among), from Proto-Germanic *mangą (mix).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mong (plural mongs)

  1. (dialect) A mixture, a crowd.[2]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Contraction of mongrel.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mong (plural mongs)

  1. (Australian slang) A mongrel dog.[3]
    • 1965, Brian James, The Big Burn: Short Stories[2], page 40:
      Some blue cattle-dogs and a small pack of mongs barked excitedly, and danced round, and wished they knew what to do in such an unheard-of situation; and no doubt dreamed for days after of what they had done to distinguish themselves.

Etymology 3[edit]

Contraction of Mongol or mongoloid.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mong (plural mongs)

  1. (dated, offensive, pejorative, Britain, slang) A person with Down's syndrome.
  2. (pejorative, Britain, slang) A stupid person.

Etymology 4[edit]

Clipping of among.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

mong

  1. (obsolete) a variant spelling of ’mong

References[edit]

  1. ^ mong” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2017.
  2. ^ Chambers Twentieth Century Dictionary
  3. ^ “Australia Decoded 'M-5'”, in Joyzine[1], accessed 2009-03-05

Dutch[edit]

Noun[edit]

mong m (plural mongs)

  1. (slang) mong, shortened version of mongool.

Malay[edit]

Noun[edit]

mong

  1. gong

Vietnamese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mong

  1. to except, to wish for something

Derived terms[edit]