mope

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See also: море (Cyrillic)

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of North Germanic origin, related to Swedish mopa (to sulk), Danish måbe. Compare also German muffen, French moue.

Verb[edit]

mope (third-person singular simple present mopes, present participle moping, simple past and past participle moped)

  1. (intransitive) To carry oneself in a depressed, lackadaisical manner; to give oneself up to low spirits; to pout, sulk.
  2. (transitive) To make spiritless and stupid.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

mope (plural mopes)

  1. The act of moping
    When she gets upset, she has a little mope, and then gets over it.
  2. (archaic) A dull, spiritless person.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970:
      putting gulleries on some or other till they have made by their humouring or gulling ex stulto insanum, a mope or a noddy
    Synonym: mopus
  3. (pornography industry) A bottom feeder who "mopes" around a pornography studio hoping for his big break and often does bit parts in exchange for room and board and meager pay.
    • 2011: LA Weekly, documenting uses dating to the 1990s
      The porn industry is many things. Subtle is not one of them. So when Porn Inc. went searching for a job title for people like Stephen Hill, the choice was "mope." It's based on the off-camera life of these fringe actors, hangers-on who mope around the studios hoping for a bit role, which if they're lucky might bring them $50 plus food — and the chance to have sex with a real, live woman.[1]

Anagrams[edit]


Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with English mope.

Noun[edit]

mope

  1. a fool, astonished

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith