mors

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Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

mors

  1. second-person singular present indicative form of morir

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

mors c

  1. genitive singular indefinite of mor

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mors

  1. first-person singular present indicative of morsen
  2. imperative of morsen

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin morsus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mors m ‎(plural mors)

  1. (equestrian) bit

External links[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *mor-tis (“death”), from *mer- ‎(to die). Cognate with Ancient Greek βροτός ‎(brotós, mortal) (from an earlier form *μροτός ‎(mrotós)), Proto-Germanic *murþą (Old English morþ, English murder), Celtic *marwo- (Old Irish marb, Welsh marw ‎(died)), Lithuanian mirtis ‎(death), Proto-Slavic *merti, Sanskrit मृत्यु ‎(mṛtyú).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mors f ‎(genitive mortis); third declension

  1. death
  2. corpse
  3. annihilation

Inflection[edit]

Third declension i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative mors mortēs
genitive mortis mortium
dative mortī mortibus
accusative mortem mortēs
ablative morte mortibus
vocative mors mortēs

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • mors in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mors in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • MORS” in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • mors” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to depart this life: mortem (diem supremum) obire
    • an untimely death: mors immatura or praematura
    • to commit suicide: mortem sibi consciscere
    • to meet death (by violence): mortem oppetere
    • to die for one's country: mortem occumbere pro patria
    • to poison oneself: veneno sibi mortem consciscere
    • to drain the cup of poison: poculum mortis (mortiferum) exhaurire (Cluent. 11. 31)
    • some one's death has plunged me in grief: mors alicuius luctum mihi attulit
    • to threaten some one with death, crucifixion, torture, war: minitari (minari) alicui mortem, crucem et tormenta, bellum
    • to beg for life: mortem deprecari (B. G. 7. 40. 6)
  • mors in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Middle French[edit]

Noun[edit]

mors f

  1. plural of mort

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin morsus.

Noun[edit]

mors m ‎(plural mors)

  1. (Jersey, equestrian) bit

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

mors n ‎(definite singular morset, indefinite plural mors, definite plural morsa or morsene)

  1. corpse
  2. indefinite singular genitive of mor

Usage notes[edit]

Using mors instead of the more common lik is a special usage found among health workers. The use of the term in this way is unknown in the general population.

Verb[edit]

mors

  1. imperative of morse

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

morsy

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mors m anim

  1. walrus (Arctic mammal)
  2. winter swimmer

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Interjection[edit]

mors!

  1. (slang) Hi!

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

mors

  1. indefinite genitive singular of mor

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French morse.

Noun[edit]

mors ‎(definite accusative morsi, plural morsler)

  1. walrus