mors

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See also: Mors and MORs

Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

mors

  1. second-person singular present indicative form of morir

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

mors c

  1. indefinite genitive singular of mor

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Verb[edit]

mors

  1. first-person singular present indicative of morsen
  2. imperative of morsen

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin morsus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mors m (plural mors)

  1. (equestrian) bit

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *mortis, from Proto-Indo-European *mértis (death), from *mer- (to die).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mors f (genitive mortis); third declension

  1. death
  2. corpse
  3. annihilation

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mors mortēs
Genitive mortis mortium
Dative mortī mortibus
Accusative mortem mortēs
mortīs
Ablative morte mortibus
Vocative mors mortēs

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • mors in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mors in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mors in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • mors in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to depart this life: mortem (diem supremum) obire
    • an untimely death: mors immatura or praematura
    • to commit suicide: mortem sibi consciscere
    • to meet death (by violence): mortem oppetere
    • to die for one's country: mortem occumbere pro patria
    • to poison oneself: veneno sibi mortem consciscere
    • to drain the cup of poison: poculum mortis (mortiferum) exhaurire (Cluent. 11. 31)
    • some one's death has plunged me in grief: mors alicuius luctum mihi attulit
    • to threaten some one with death, crucifixion, torture, war: minitari (minari) alicui mortem, crucem et tormenta, bellum
    • to beg for life: mortem deprecari (B. G. 7. 40. 6)
  • mors in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Middle French[edit]

Noun[edit]

mors f

  1. plural of mort

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin morsus.

Noun[edit]

mors m (plural mors)

  1. (Jersey, equestrian) bit

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Noun[edit]

mors n (definite singular morset, indefinite plural mors, definite plural morsa or morsene)

  1. corpse
  2. indefinite singular genitive of mor

Usage notes[edit]

Using mors instead of the more common lik is a special usage found among health workers. The use of the term in this way is unknown in the general population.

Verb[edit]

mors

  1. imperative of morse

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl
morsy

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mors m anim

  1. walrus (Arctic mammal)
  2. winter swimmer

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Possibly an alteration of morgon (morning), or from Tavringer Romani mus, muss, musij, mossj, måssj (man, person), from Romani murś (man). Related to Sanskrit मनुष्य (manuṣya, man). Compare English mush.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

mors!

  1. (colloquial) hi, hello

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

mors

  1. indefinite genitive singular of mor

References[edit]

  • mors in Svensk ordbok (SO)
  • “musch” in Gerd Carling, Romani i svenskan: Storstadsslang och standardspråk, Stockholm: Carlsson, 2005, →ISBN, page 93.


Anagrams[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French morse.

Noun[edit]

mors (definite accusative morsi, plural morsler)

  1. walrus