mund

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See also: Mund and mund'

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English mund, from Proto-Germanic *mundō (hand, protection, security).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mund (plural munds)

  1. (obsolete) A hand.
  2. (obsolete) security, granted by a king or earl, the violation of which was punished by a fine (a mundbyrd)
  3. Protection, guardianship.

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably from Proto-Indo-European *mendh (to pay attention to, be vivacious). Compare Old Norse munda (aim, strive), Gothic mundon (mundon, look up), Old High German muntar (keen, eager), Ancient Greek μανθάνω (manthánō, learn), Lithuanian mañdras (alert, awake, smart, minxish).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mund m

  1. trouble
  2. toil
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *māK(e)nT-, from Proto-Indo-European *magʰ- (can, to be able (to do)). Cognate to Lithuanian mokė́ti (to be able), Gothic magan (magan, to be able, have power), Old Church Slavonic мошти (mošti, to be able). Alternatively from Proto-Indo-European *men(s)-dʰ(e)h₂ (to learn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mund (first-person singular past tense munda, participle mundur)

  1. I can.
  2. I am able.
  3. I beat, win over.
Inflection[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Danish[edit]

mund

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse muðr, munnr, from Proto-Germanic *munþaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mund c (singular definite munden, plural indefinite munde)

  1. mouth (the opening of an animal through which food is ingested)

Inflection[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

mund

  1. imperative of munde

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse mund, from Proto-Germanic *mundō.

Noun[edit]

mund f (genitive singular mundar, nominative plural mundir)

  1. (poetic) hand
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Related to Old Norse munda (to aim, to strive), Old High German muntar (keen, eager).

Noun[edit]

mund f (genitive singular mundar, nominative plural mundir) or mund n (genitive singular munds, nominative plural mund)

  1. Used only in set phrases.
Declension[edit]

or

Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse muðr, munnr, from Proto-Germanic *munþaz.

Noun[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

mund

  1. mouth

Inflection[edit]

singular plural
indefinite mund munder
definite munden mundene

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *munþaz.

Noun[edit]

mund m

  1. mouth

Descendants[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *mundō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mund f (nominative plural munda or munde)

  1. (poetic) hand
  2. trust, security. protection
  3. protector, guardian

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mundus.

Noun[edit]

mund m (oblique plural munz or muntz, nominative singular munz or muntz, nominative plural mund)

  1. the world

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *mundō (hand). Further cognates see there.

Noun[edit]

mund f

  1. hand

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • mund in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mundus.

Noun[edit]

mund m (plural munds)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) world