mund

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English mund, from Germanic. Cognate with German Mund, Munt ‎(legal protection).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mund ‎(plural munds)

  1. (obsolete) A hand.
  2. (obsolete) security, granted by a king or earl, the violation of which was punished by a fine (a mundbyrd)
  3. Protection, guardianship.

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Probably from Proto-Indo-European *mendh ‎(to pay attention to, be vivacious). Compare Old Norse munda ‎(aim, strive), Gothic mundon ‎(mundon, look up), Old High German muntar ‎(keen, eager), Ancient Greek μανθάνω ‎(manthánō, learn), Lithuanian mañdras ‎(alert, awake, smart, minxish).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mund m

  1. trouble
  2. toil
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *māK(e)nT-, from Proto-Indo-European *magʰ- ‎(can, to be able (to do)). Cognate to Lithuanian mokė́ti ‎(to be able), Gothic magan ‎(magan, to be able, have power), Old Church Slavonic мошти ‎(mošti, to be able). Alternatively from Proto-Indo-European *men(s)-dʰ(e)h₂ ‎(to learn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mund ‎(first-person singular past tense munda, participle mundur)

  1. I can.
  2. I am able.
  3. I beat, win over.
Inflection[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Danish[edit]

mund

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse muðr, munnr, from Proto-Germanic *munþaz ‎(mouth), from Proto-Indo-European *ment-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mund c (singular definite munden, plural indefinite munde)

  1. mouth (the opening of an animal through which food is ingested)

Inflection[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

mund

  1. imperative of munde

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse mund ‎(hand), from Proto-Germanic *mundō with a variety of meanings. Further cognates see there.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mund f

  1. hand

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse muðr, munnr, from Proto-Germanic *munþaz ‎(mouth), from Proto-Indo-European *ment-.

Noun[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

mund

  1. mouth

Inflection[edit]

singular plural
indefinite mund munder
definite munden mundene

Old Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *munþaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ment-. Compare Old Saxon mūth, Old Frisian mūth, mund, mond, Old High German mund, Old English mūþ, Old Norse muðr, munnr.

Noun[edit]

mund m

  1. mouth

Descendants[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *mundō with a variety of meanings, from the Proto-Indo-European *man- ‎(hand). Further cognates see there.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mund f (nominative plural munda or munde)

  1. (poetic) hand
  2. trust, security. protection
  3. protector, guardian

Derived terms[edit]

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mundus.

Noun[edit]

mund m ‎(oblique plural munz or muntz, nominative singular munz or muntz, nominative plural mund)

  1. the world

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *mundō ‎(hand). Further cognates see there.

Noun[edit]

mund f

  1. hand

Descendants[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mundus.

Noun[edit]

mund m (plural munds)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) world