muse

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Muse, musé, musė, muše, and Muße

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French muse, from Latin Mūsa, from Ancient Greek Μοῦσα (Moûsa).

Noun[edit]

muse (plural muses)

  1. A source of inspiration.
    Yoko Ono was John Lennon's wife, lover, and muse.
  2. (archaic) A poet; a bard.
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English musen, from Old French muser.

Verb[edit]

muse (third-person singular simple present muses, present participle musing, simple past and past participle mused)

  1. (intransitive) To become lost in thought, to ponder.
  2. (transitive) To say (something) with due consideration or thought.
  3. (transitive) To think on; to meditate on.
    • c. 1726, James Thomson, Hymn
      Come, then, expressive Silence, muse his praise.
    • 2013 June 7, David Simpson, “Fantasy of navigation”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 36:
      It is tempting to speculate about the incentives or compulsions that might explain why anyone would take to the skies in [the] basket [of a balloon]: […];  […]; or perhaps to muse on the irrelevance of the borders that separate nation states and keep people from understanding their shared environment.
  4. (transitive) To wonder at.
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

muse (plural muses)

  1. An act of musing; a period of thoughtfulness.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.xii:
      still he sate long time astonished / As in great muse, ne word to creature spake.
    • 1978, Lawrence Durrell, Livia, Faber & Faber 1992 (Avignon Quintet), p. 416:
      He fell into a muse and pulled his upper lip.

Etymology 3[edit]

From French musse. See muset.

Noun[edit]

muse (plural muses)

  1. A gap or hole in a hedge, fence, etc. through which a wild animal is accustomed to pass; a muset.
    Find a hare without a muse. (old proverb)

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

muse f (plural muses)

  1. artistic inspiration
  2. muse (specific artistic subject)

Verb[edit]

muse

  1. first-person singular present indicative of muser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of muser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of muser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of muser
  5. second-person singular imperative of muser

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

muse f

  1. plural of musa

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English mūs.

Noun[edit]

muse

  1. Alternative form of mous

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin Mūsa.

Noun[edit]

muse

  1. Alternative form of Muse

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

Etymology[edit]

From French musée, from Latin mūsēum, from Ancient Greek Μουσεῖον (Mouseîon)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /mʉ.seː/, [mʉʷ.ˈseː]

Noun[edit]

muse n (definite singular museet, indefinite plural muse or museer, definite plural museene or musea)

  1. Alternative form of musé

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Ancient Greek Μοῦσα (Moûsa).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

muse f (definite singular musa, indefinite plural muser, definite plural musene)

  1. a muse

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

muse (present tense musar, past tense musa, past participle musa, passive infinitive musast, present participle musande, imperative mus)

  1. to whisper
    Synonym: kviskre

Etymology 3[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From French musée, from Latin mūsēum, from Ancient Greek Μουσεῖον (Mouseîon)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

muse n (definite singular museet, indefinite plural muse, definite plural musea)

  1. alternative spelling of musé

References[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

muse

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of musirse.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of musirse.