nauseous

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈnɔːzɪəs/, /ˈnɔːsɪəs/
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  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈnɔːʃəs/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /ˈnɑːʃəs/

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nauseōsus (causing nausea), corresponding synchronically to nausea +‎ -ous.

Adjective[edit]

nauseous (comparative more nauseous, superlative most nauseous)

  1. Causing nausea; sickening or disgusting. [from 17th c.]
    • 1786, Hester Thrale Piozzi, Thraliana, 27 June:
      [T]he Italians grossness of Conversation is still very offensive & nauseous, tho' long accustomed to it.
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, I:
      And then what proper person can be partial / To all those nauseous epigrams of Martial?
  2. (obsolete) Inclined to nausea; sickly, squeamish. [17th c.]
  3. (sometimes proscribed) Afflicted with nausea; sick. [from 19th c.]
    • 1848, Samuel Hahnemann, The Chronic Diseases, Their Specific Nature and Their Homeopathic Treatment: Antipsoric Remedies, Volume 2:
      After he had scarcely eaten enough, he felt nauseous; but nausea ceased as soon as he stopped eating entirely, …
    • 1878, The North American Journal of Homeopathy, Volume 27:
      [] during stretching the patient felt nauseous
    • 2010, Tom Smith, The Guardian, 4 Sep 2010:
      Is it a myth that you shouldn't drink alcohol while taking antibiotics? I often do and haven't felt remotely nauseous.

Usage notes[edit]

Some state that nauseous should be used as synonymous with nauseating. AHD4 notes that that in common usage, nauseous is synonymous with nauseated.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also[edit]