neart

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Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish nert(strength, might, power; ability; control), from Proto-Celtic *nertom(strength, force), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ner-to-(virile, strong), a derivative of *h₂nḗr(man; vital energy).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

neart m ‎(genitive singular nirt)

  1. strength; force, power
    Proverb: neart go cur le chéile.‎ ― Unity is strength.
    1. fortitude
  2. a large amount (followed by the genitive; usually translated into English by plenty, much, many or a lot)
    neart airgid aige.
    He has a lot of money.
    Bhí neart daoine sa tseomra.
    There were many people in the room.
  3. power to prevent, to remedy
    Proverb: Níl neart ar an mbás (ach pósadh arís).‎ ― There is no cure for death (but to marry again).
  4. ability

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

  • aimhneart m(want of strength, weakness)

References[edit]

  • "neart" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • nert” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Latvian[edit]

Verb[edit]

neart

  1. to not plow; negative form of art

Conjugation[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish nert(strength, might, power; ability; control), from Proto-Celtic *nertom(strength, force), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ner-to-(virile, strong), a derivative of *h₂nḗr(man; vital energy).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

neart m ‎(genitive singular nèirt, no plural)

  1. strength, power, might, energy, pith, force, vigour
  2. plenty, abundance, many, number
  3. the greater part of something
  4. valour
  5. (rarely) miracle

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, ISBN 0 901771 92 9
  • nert” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.