nuntius

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Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin nuntius.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈnʏn.tsi.ʏs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: nun‧ti‧us

Noun[edit]

nuntius m (plural nuntii or nuntiussen)

  1. (Roman Catholicism) A nuncio (diplomatic representative of the Holy See).

Usage notes[edit]

The most common plural is nuntii, which is favoured by Catholic sources. The plural nuntiussen is mostly used by the secular press and to a lesser degree by the Protestant press.

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Uncertain; competing hypotheses include:

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nūntius m (genitive nūntiī or nūntī); second declension

  1. a messenger, reporter, courier
  2. an envoy, message, report
  3. a command, order, injunction
  4. (in the plural) news, tidings, information

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative nūntius nūntiī
Genitive nūntiī
nūntī1
nūntiōrum
Dative nūntiō nūntiīs
Accusative nūntium nūntiōs
Ablative nūntiō nūntiīs
Vocative nūntie nūntiī

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tucker, T.G., Etymological Dictionary of Latin, Ares Publishers
  2. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nuntius (envoy).

Noun[edit]

nuntius m (definite singular nuntien or nuntiusen, indefinite plural nuntier, definite plural nuntiene)

  1. (Roman Catholicism) a nuncio

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nuntius (envoy).

Noun[edit]

nuntius m (definite singular nuntiusen, indefinite plural nuntiusar, definite plural nuntiusane)

  1. (Roman Catholicism) a nuncio