obeyance

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From obey +‎ -ance.

Noun[edit]

obeyance (uncountable)

  1. obedience
    • 1829, Various, The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction[1]:
      Poor fellow! how happy would a companion make you, to whom you could relate your battles, bouts, and courtships; but mum is the order, and Jack is used to an implicit obeyance of head-quarter orders.
    • 1912, W.J. Jackman and Thos. H. Russell, Flying Machines[2]:
      One of the instructions given by experienced aviators to pupils, and for which they insist upon implicit obeyance, is: "If your machine gets more than 30 feet high, or comes closer to the ground than 6 feet, descend at once."
    • 1962, Harry Harrison, Planet of the Damned[3]:
      The tall soldiers of Nyjord moved in ready obeyance of their commander.

Etymology 2[edit]

Misspelling or alteration of abeyance, by association with obey.

Noun[edit]

obeyance (uncountable)

  1. (nonstandard) abeyance
    • 1897, Dorothy Quigley, What Dress Makes of Us[4]:
      The disfiguring wrinkles that make many necks unsightly may be kept in obeyance by massaging.