obligate

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin obligātus, past participle of obligō. Doublet of oblige, taken through French.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) (verb): enPR: äbʹlĭ-gātˈ, IPA(key): /ˈɑb.lɪˌɡeɪt/
(adjective): enPR: äbʹlĭ-gĭt, IPA(key): /ˈɑb.lɪ.ɡɪt/
  • (UK) (verb): enPR: ôbʹlĭ-gātˈ, IPA(key): /ˈɒb.lɪˌɡeɪt/
  • (file)
(adjective): enPR: ôbʹlĭ-gĭt, IPA(key): /ˈɒb.lɪ.ɡɪt/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

obligate (third-person singular simple present obligates, present participle obligating, simple past and past participle obligated)

  1. (transitive, Canada, US, Scotland) To bind, compel, constrain, or oblige by a social, legal, or moral tie.
  2. (transitive, Canada, US, Scotland) To cause to be grateful or indebted; to oblige.
  3. (transitive, Canada, US, Scotland) To commit (money, for example) in order to fulfill an obligation.

Usage notes[edit]

In non-legal usage, almost exclusively used in the passive, in form “obligated to X” where ‘X’ is a verb infinitive or noun phrase, as in “obligated to pay”. Further, it is now only in standard use in American English and some dialects such as Scottish,[1] having disappeared from standard British English by the 20th century, being replaced by obliged (it was previously used in the 17th through 19th centuries).[2]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

obligate (comparative more obligate, superlative most obligate)

  1. (biology) Requiring a (specified) way of life, habitat, etc.. [from 19th c.]
    • 2018, Tim Flannery, Europe: The First 100 Million Years, Penguin 2019, p. 171:
      [A]nalysis of the chemical composition of their bones reveals that they were obligate carnivores.
  2. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (biology) Absolutely indispensable; essential.
    In addition to being the obligate food source for monarch caterpillars, milkweeds also provide abundant nectar for the adult butterflies.
    • 2009, C. Kenneth Dodd Jr., Amphibian Ecology and Conservation: A Handbook of Techniques, page 304:
      Aquatic sites constitute obligate habitat for some species, and are critical breeding habitat for species with complex life cycles involving aquatic egg or larval development.
    • 2012, Ulrich Sommer, Plankton Ecology: Succession in Plankton Communities, page 351:
      Unlike for phagotrophic flagellates, bacteria serve as a facultative rather than an obligate food source for crustacean zooplankton.
    • 2013, K.C. Marshall, editor, Advances in Microbial Ecology, volume 11, page 472:
      Light is the obligate energy source for the phototrophic microbes constructing these benthic mats

Antonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • obligate at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • obligate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911
  1. ^ Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of English Usage, p. 675
  2. ^ The New Fowler’s Modern English Usage (1996)

Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /obliˈɡate/
  • Hyphenation: o‧bli‧ga‧te
  • Rhymes: -ate

Verb[edit]

obligate

  1. present adverbial passive participle of obligi

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

obligate

  1. inflection of obligat:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

obligāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of obligātus