office

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman office, offis etc., and Old French office, from Latin officium ‎(task, business, duty, official duty, office, court), probably a contraction of opificium ‎(the doing of a work, a working), from opifex ‎(one who does a work), from opus ‎(work) + facere ‎(to do).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

office ‎(plural offices)

  1. A building or room where clerical or professional duties are performed.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, The Celebrity:
      We drove back to the office with some concern on my part at the prospect of so large a case. Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke. He was dressed out in broad gaiters and bright tweeds, like an English tourist, and his face might have belonged to Dagon, idol of the Philistines.
    • 1915, George A. Birmingham, Gossamer, chapterI:
      There is an hour or two, after the passengers have embarked, which is disquieting and fussy. [] Passengers wander restlessly about or hurry, with futile energy, from place to place. Pushing men hustle each other at the windows of the purser's office, under pretence of expecting letters or despatching telegrams.
    • 2013 August 3, “Revenge of the nerds”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8847: 
      Think of banking today and the image is of grey-suited men in towering skyscrapers. Its future, however, is being shaped in converted warehouses and funky offices in San Francisco, New York and London, where bright young things in jeans and T-shirts huddle around laptops, sipping lattes or munching on free food.
  2. A bureau, an administrative unit of government.
    • 2005, Australian Joint Copying Project Handbook: Part 11, National Library Australia (ISBN 9780642276155)
      In 1968 it in turn merged with the Foreign Office to form the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.
  3. A position of responsibility of some authority within an organisation.
    an executive or judicial office;  a municipal office
    • 1828, Henry Potter, The Office and Duty of a Justice of the Peace: And a Guide to Sheriffs, Coroners, Clerks, Constables, and Other Civil Officers. According to the Laws of North-Carolina, [], page 33
      No court of 'pleas' and quarter sessions shall admit to the bar of such court, as a practising attorney, any person who holds the office of justice of the peace in said county, until he first tender to the court his resignation of said office.
  4. A charge or trust; a function.
    • 1593, William Shakespeare, Venus and Adonis
      So, at his bloody view, her eyes are fled / Into the deep dark cabills of her head; / Where they resign their office and their light / To the disposing of her troubled brain;
    • 1611, Bible (Authorized, or King James, Version), Romans 11:13
      Inasmuch as I am the apostle of the Gentiles, I magnify mine office.
    • John Milton (1608-1674)
      Hesperus, whose office is to bring / Twilight upon the earth.
    • Isaac Newton (1642-1727)
      In this experiment the several intervals of the teeth of the comb do the office of so many prisms.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, Book IV, chapter i
      The antients would certainly have invoked the goddess Flora for this purpose, and it would have been no difficulty for their priests, or politicians to have persuaded the people of the real presence of the deity, though a plain mortal had personated her and performed her office.
  5. Rite, ceremonial observance of social or religious nature.
  6. Religious service, especially a liturgy officiated by a Christian priest or minister.
    • John Evelyn (1620-1706)
      This morning was read in the church, after the office was done, the declaration setting forth the late conspiracy against the king's person.
  7. A major administrative division, notably in certain governmental administrations, either at ministry level (e.g. the British Home Office) or within or dependent on such a department.
  8. (obsolete) That which a person does, either voluntarily or by appointment, for, or with reference to, others; customary duty, or a duty that arises from human relations.
    kind offices;  pious offices
  9. (in the plural) The parts of a house given over to household work, storage etc.
  10. An office suite; a collection of work‐related computer programs (shortened from several such suites with 'office' in their name).

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

office ‎(third-person singular simple present offices, present participle officing, simple past and past participle officed)

  1. To provide (someone) with an office.
    • 1966, United States. Congress. Senate, Hearings - Volume 8[1], page 451:
      Is he officed in Congressional Relations or is he officed in SCA?
    • 1976, General Technical Report RM.[2], page 128:
      Prior to that time, Station personnel were first officed in temporary wartime barracks on the campus and then on the second floor of the Journalism Building.
  2. (intransitive) To have an office.
    • 1988 December 2, Grant Pick, “He Survived Operation Greylord”, Chicago Reader:
      "I believed that Dave was just doing a favor for his brother," said Somerville, who added that he assumed Lou and Dave officed together.

References[edit]

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967
  • office in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin officium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

office m ‎(plural offices)

  1. charge, task, mandate
  2. administrative bureau, department
  3. religious service, notably liturgical office
  4. place where a household's table (food and drink)-related services are conducted, especially by domestic staff

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Nouveau Petit Larousse illustré. Dictionnaire encyclopédique. Paris, Librairie Larousse, 1952, 146th edition

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

office

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of officiō

Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

office m ‎(oblique plural offices, nominative singular offices, nominative plural office)

  1. office (building; room)
  2. office (position, role, job)
  3. service

References[edit]