oganesson

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
Chemical element
Og
Previous: tennessine (Ts)
Next: ununennium (Uue)

Etymology[edit]

Oganessian +‎ -on. Promulgated in June 2016 by the IUPAC based on recommendations of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to honor the Russian physicist Yuri Oganessian (born 1933) who researched superheavy elements.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: ōgənĕs'ŏn, IPA(key): /oʊ.ɡəˈnɛsɒn/

Noun[edit]

oganesson (uncountable)

  1. The chemical element (Symbol Og) with atomic number 118. It is the heaviest known element. Highly radioactive, it does not occur naturally. Originally expected to be a noble gas, it is now predicted to be a reactive metallic solid, and a semi-conductor or a post-transition metal. [1]
    • 2016 June 9, “Meet the periodic table's 4 new elements: Nihonium, moscouvium, tennessine and oganesson”, in The Straits Times[2]:
      SINGAPORE - The four new elements announced in December last year have received their new names: Nihonium (Nh), moscouvium (Mc), tennessine (Ts) and oganesson (Og).
    • 2018, Mark Weller; Tina Overton; ‎Fraser Armstrong; Jonathan Rourke, chapter 1, in Inorganic Chemistry[3], Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 21:
      In January 2016 the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) announced the discovery of four new elements, so completing the seventh row of the periodic table. They have since been named as nihonium, Nh, muscovium[sic], Mc, tennessine, Ts, and organesson[sic], Og. The procedures for naming new elements are clearly laid out by IUPAC.
    • 2019 February 27, Emily Conover, “Extreme elements push the boundaries of the periodic table”, in Science News[4]:
      Researchers carefully choose the makeup of the beam and the target in hopes of producing a designer atom of the element desired. That’s how the four newest elements were created: nihonium (element 113), moscovium (115), tennessine (117) and oganesson (118) (SN Online: 11/30/16).

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1], "Oganesson Is a Semiconductor: On the Relativistic Band-Gap Narrowing in the Heaviest Noble-Gas Solids"

Danish[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 oganesson on Danish Wikipedia

Noun[edit]

oganesson

  1. oganesson

Finnish[edit]

Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fi

Noun[edit]

oganesson

  1. oganesson

Declension[edit]

Inflection of oganesson (Kotus type 6/paperi, no gradation)
nominative oganesson oganessonit
genitive oganessonin oganessonien
oganessoneiden
oganessoneitten
partitive oganessonia oganessoneita
oganessoneja
illative oganessoniin oganessoneihin
singular plural
nominative oganesson oganessonit
accusative nom. oganesson oganessonit
gen. oganessonin
genitive oganessonin oganessonien
oganessoneiden
oganessoneitten
partitive oganessonia oganessoneita
oganessoneja
inessive oganessonissa oganessoneissa
elative oganessonista oganessoneista
illative oganessoniin oganessoneihin
adessive oganessonilla oganessoneilla
ablative oganessonilta oganessoneilta
allative oganessonille oganessoneille
essive oganessonina oganessoneina
translative oganessoniksi oganessoneiksi
instructive oganessonein
abessive oganessonitta oganessoneitta
comitative oganessoneineen
Possessive forms of oganesson (type paperi)
possessor singular plural
1st person oganessonini oganessonimme
2nd person oganessonisi oganessoninne
3rd person oganessoninsa

Icelandic[edit]

Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia is
Chemical element
Og
Previous: tennessín (Ts)

Noun[edit]

oganesson n (genitive singular oganessons, no plural)

  1. oganesson (chemical element)

Declension[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

Named after Jurij Oganesian (the Norwegian spelling varies) +‎ -on

Noun[edit]

oganesson n (definite singular oganessonet, uncountable)

  1. oganesson (chemical element with atomic number 118 and the symbol Og)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

Named after Jurij Oganesian +‎ -on

Noun[edit]

oganesson n (definite singular oganessonet, uncountable)

  1. oganesson (chemical element with atomic number 118 and the symbol Og)

References[edit]