onu

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Apalaí[edit]

Noun[edit]

onu

  1. eye

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Via earlier *õno from Proto-Finnic *enoi (compare Votic ono, Finnish eno, Ingrian enoi), originally a derivative from the same root as enam.

Noun[edit]

onu (genitive onu, partitive onu)

  1. uncle

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Ido[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

onu

  1. one, someone, they (indefinite personal pronoun)

Turkish[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

onu

  1. him, her, it (definite accusative of o)

Wauja[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From o- (3rd person possessive) +‎ -nu (wife).

Noun[edit]

onu (plural onunaun)

  1. his wife
    Wajamani oputapai paowa onupei, Apaipua onupei, paitsupalu. "Nowan, pinyupei katouhan," Yumekeju wiu, umapai Wajamani. Apaipua iya oukala ja onaatsiu, Yehinaku outsa!! Oukaka onupei, oukaka taunapai Wauja oputankan sekunya.
    Wajamani gave as a wife to his nephew — as a wife to [his nephew] Apaipua — his own daughter. "My nephew, take this one as your wife," Wajamani said, referring to Yumekeju. [So] Apaipua went to fetch her from there, from the Mehinaku village! That's how [she] became his wife, and that's how she came to stay in the Wauja village long ago.
    Kitsimain iya panupei sukuti yiu. Omalanyaintsa, iya kalahan, kuyekuyeju...
    Irityulakume eu whun, a-MU-naun wiu. A-MU-naun whun. Iyawi yiu. Itsa kala onu katouhan.
    Mepiaunwaun onu?
    Mepiaunwaun onu.
    [Storyteller:] First he took as his wife Sukuti (Green Parakeet Woman). After that, he took that one, Kuyekuyeju (Dusky Parrot Woman)…
    That was Irityulakuma (Blue Cotinga Bird). [He] was a chief, [he] was. Chief [of his village]. He took them [in marriage]. [So] his wives were this many [holds up fingers].
    [Audience member:] Two wives?
    [Storyteller:] Two wives.

Inflection: Possession[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • -nu is a bound morpheme and must always have a possessive prefix, answering the question "whose wife"? In other words, this noun is obligatorily possessed, and must show possession by someone. In the Wauja way of thinking, a wife is always somebody's wife (just as a husband is always somebody's husband).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • "Wajamani oputapai" (transcript page 21) uttered by Aruta, storyteller and elder, recounting Wauja history in the presence of his son and nephew. Recorded in Piyulaga village by E. Ireland, 4/25/96.
  • "Kitsimain iya" (transcript, pp. 4-5) uttered by Aruta, storyteller and elder, as he recounted the traditional tale, "The Caiman Spirit" (Yakaojokuma). Recorded in Piyulaga village in the presence of assembled elders and others, November 1989.