orator

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman oratour, from Latin orator.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

orator ‎(plural orators)

  1. Someone who orates or delivers an oration.
  2. A skilled and eloquent public speaker.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From orare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ōrātor m ‎(genitive ōrātōris); third declension

  1. orator, speaker

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative ōrātor ōrātōrēs
genitive ōrātōris ōrātōrum
dative ōrātōrī ōrātōribus
accusative ōrātōrem ōrātōrēs
ablative ōrātōre ōrātōribus
vocative ōrātor ōrātōrēs

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • orator in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • orator in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ORATOR” in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • orator” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to sketch the ideal of an orator: imaginem perfecti oratoris adumbrare
    • to be considered the foremost orator: primum or principem inter oratores locum obtinere
    • to say only a few words: pauca dicere (pauca verba dicere only of the orator)
  • orator in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • orator” in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • orator in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French orateur, Latin ōrātor.

Noun[edit]

orator m ‎(plural oratori, feminine equivalent oratoare)

  1. orator, speaker

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ǒraːtor/
  • Hyphenation: o‧ra‧tor

Noun[edit]

òrātor m ‎(Cyrillic spelling о̀ра̄тор)

  1. orator

Declension[edit]