paduka

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: pāduka

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From a Sanskrit word, derived from the word for "foot".

Noun[edit]

paduka (plural padukas)

  1. Traditional Indian footwear, essentially consisting of a sole with a post and knob engaged between the big toe and second toe.
    • 2009 June 3, Derick Chetty, “Flip-flop with modern sole”, in Toronto Star[1]:
      These natural-rubber sandals are based on the paduka or toe-knob sandals, a 5,000-year-old Indian shoe design.

Anagrams[edit]

Balinese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

paduka

  1. Romanization of ᬧᬵᬤᬸᬓ.

Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Malay paduka (footwear, honorable), from Sanskrit पादुक (pāduka).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pa.du.ka/
  • Hyphenation: pa‧du‧ka

Noun[edit]

paduka

  1. footwear, see paduka.
  2. honorable, such king, etc.

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit पादुक (pāduka).

Noun[edit]

paduka (Jawi spellingڤدوک⁩, plural paduka-paduka, informal 1st possessive padukaku, 2nd possessive padukamu, 3rd possessive padukanya)

  1. His Majesty, Your Majesty (for a king or sultan).
    Seri Paduka Baginda Yang di-Pertuan Agong (His Majesty, the Paramount Ruler).
  2. An ancient footwear.
  3. An address for a very respected person, the honourable.
    Imam Paduka Tuan (The Honourable Senior Imam)

Further reading[edit]