passim

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Latin passim (here and there, everywhere).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpæsɪm/
  • (file)

Adverb[edit]

passim (not comparable)

  1. Throughout (used in citations to indicate that something, as a word, phrase, or idea, is to be found at many places throughout the work cited).
    • 1751, David Hume, An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals:
      The sceptics assert [Sext. Emp. adversus Math. lib. viii.], though absurdly, that the origin of all religious worship was derived from the utility of inanimate objects, as the sun and moon, to the support and well-being of mankind. This is also the common reason assigned by historians, for the deification of eminent heroes and legislators [Diod. Sic. passim.].
    • 1978, Supreme Court of the United States, F.C.C. v. Pacifica Foundation:
      See also Hearings on H.R.8825 before the House Committee on the Merchant Marine and Fisheries, 70th Cong., 1st Sess., passim (1928).

Adjective[edit]

passim (not comparable)

  1. (rare) That which occurs at various places throughout a text
    • 1895, J. Marshall, Westminster Gazette, 4, September 2/3:
      In these passim allusions one often ‘nods’.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From passus (spread out) +‎ -tim, from pandō (I spread).

Adverb[edit]

passim (not comparable)

  1. everywhere
    Synonyms: ubique, quācumquē
  2. here and there, hither and thither; (at or to different places)
  3. without distinction, without order, randomly
    Synonym: prōmiscē
  4. mindlessly, without thinking about it
    Synonym: temere

Descendants[edit]

  • English: passim

References[edit]

  • passim”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • passim”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • passim in Enrico Olivetti, editor (2003-2024) Dizionario Latino, Olivetti Media Communication
  • passim in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • passim in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • far and wide; on all sides; everywhere: longe lateque, passim (e.g. fluere)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from Latin passim.

Adverb[edit]

passim

  1. passim

Spanish[edit]

Adverb[edit]

passim

  1. passim

Further reading[edit]