pillage

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French pillage, from piller (plunder), from an unattested meaning of Late Latin piliō, probably a figurative use of Latin pilō (I remove (hair)), from pilus (hair).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɪl.ɪdʒ/, /ˈpɪl.ədʒ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪlədʒ

Verb[edit]

pillage (third-person singular simple present pillages, present participle pillaging, simple past and past participle pillaged)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To loot or plunder by force, especially in time of war.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

pillage (countable and uncountable, plural pillages)

  1. The spoils of war.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare
      Which pillage they with merry march bring home.
  2. The act of pillaging.
    • 2013, Zoë Marriage, Formal Peace and Informal War: Security and Development in Congo
      An employee at a brewery in Kinshasa rated the aftermath as more catastrophic to the company than the direct violence: It was more the consequences of the pillages that hit Bracongo – the poverty of the people, our friends who buy beer.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

piller +‎ -age

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pillage m (plural pillages)

  1. pillage

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French pillage.

Noun[edit]

pillage m (plural pillages)

  1. (Jersey) looting

Related terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

pillage m (oblique plural pillages, nominative singular pillages, nominative plural pillage)

  1. pillaging

Related terms[edit]