polo

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See also: Polo, polo-, poło, pólo, póló, and pôlo

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Balti པོ་ལོ ‎(pulu, ball). Cognate with Tibetan པོ་ལོ ‎(po lo), ཕོ་ལོང ‎(pho long), སྤོ་ལོ ‎(spo lo, ball).

Noun[edit]

polo ‎(usually uncountable, plural polos)

  1. (uncountable) A ball game where two teams of players on horseback use long-handled mallets to propel the ball along the ground and into their opponent's goal.
  2. A similar game played on the ice, or on a prepared floor, by players wearing skates.
  3. (countable) A polo shirt.
    • 2007 February 22, Mike Albo, “Outfitters to Presidents, Preppies, Me”:
      Then on the second floor there is the creepy boy’s section, which had little headless mannequins in premium polos ($39.50), rugby shirts ($49.50) and a precocious leather pilot jacket for $148.
Usage notes[edit]

The word polo has the following commercial uses:

  • Polo Mints - A white mint flavoured sweet with a hole in the centre.
  • VW Polo - A type of car manufactured by Volkswagen
Derived terms[edit]
  • polo shirt - A T-shaped shirt with a collar and two buttons.
  • polo neck - A garment, usually a sweater, with a round, high collar that folds over and covers the neck. (Can also be used as an adjective, e.g. polo-necked jumper.)
  • water polo - A version of the game above, played in a swimming pool instead of on horseback.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Spanish, an air or popular song in Andalusia.

Noun[edit]

polo

  1. A Spanish gypsy dance characterized by energetic movements of the body while the feet merely shuffle or glide, with unison singing and rhythmic clapping of hands.

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a contraction of the preposition por ‎(for, by) + neuter singular article lo ‎(the).

Contraction[edit]

polo n ‎(masculine pol, feminine pola, masculine plural polos, feminine plural poles)

  1. for the, by the

Esperanto[edit]

Noun[edit]

polo ‎(accusative singular polon, plural poloj, accusative plural polojn)

  1. a Pole (person from Poland)

Hypernyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Finnish[edit]

(index po)

Etymology[edit]

From the verb polkea ‎(to stomp) +‎ -o.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈpolo]
  • Rhymes: -olo
  • Hyphenation: po‧lo

Noun[edit]

polo

  1. (descriptive) poor (one to be pitied)
    poikapolo
    poor boy

Declension[edit]

Inflection of polo (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative polo polot
genitive polon polojen
partitive poloa poloja
illative poloon poloihin
singular plural
nominative polo polot
accusative nom.? polo polot
gen. polon
genitive polon polojen
partitive poloa poloja
inessive polossa poloissa
elative polosta poloista
illative poloon poloihin
adessive pololla poloilla
ablative pololta poloilta
allative pololleˣ poloilleˣ
essive polona poloina
translative poloksi poloiksi
instructive poloin
abessive polotta poloitta
comitative poloineen

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Contraction of por lo.

Contraction[edit]

polo ‎(feminine pola, masculine plural polos, feminine plural polas)

  1. through the; by the; for the
    O ladrón entrou pola ventá.
    The thief entered through the window.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin pullus.

Noun[edit]

polo m ‎(plural polos)

  1. chick (young bird, especially a chicken)
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin polus, from Ancient Greek πόλος ‎(pólos).

Noun[edit]

polo m ‎(plural polos)

  1. (geography, electricity) pole

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

polo m ‎(plural polos)

  1. polo (ball game)
  2. polo shirt

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

polo m ‎(plural poli)

  1. (countable) pole (geographic, electrical or magnetic)
  2. (uncountable) polo (sport)

See also[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

polō

  1. dative singular of polus
  2. ablative singular of polus

Latvian[edit]

Noun[edit]

polo m (invariable)

  1. polo

Related terms[edit]


Lower Sorbian[edit]

Noun[edit]

polo n ‎(diminutive polack)

  1. obsolete spelling of pólo

Declension[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin polus ‎(pole), from Ancient Greek πόλος ‎(pólos, axis of rotation).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

polo m (plural polos)

  1. pole (geographic, magnetic)
  2. (figuratively) extreme opposite

Etymology 2[edit]

From English polo, from Balti པོ་ལོ ‎(pulu, ball).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

polo m (plural polos)

  1. polo (game, shirt)

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin pullus.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

polo m (plural polos)

  1. eyas

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old Portuguese polo, from por + lo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Contraction[edit]

polo m ‎(plural polos, feminine pola, feminine plural polas)

  1. (obsolete) Contraction of por ‎(by; through; for) + o ‎(the)

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin polus, from πόλος ‎(pólos).

Noun[edit]

polo m ‎(plural polos)

  1. (geography, electricity) pole
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English polo.

Noun[edit]

polo m ‎(uncountable)

  1. polo (ball game)
  2. polo
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Originally a trademark

Noun[edit]

polo m ‎(plural polos)

  1. (chiefly Spain) popsicle, ice lolly

Etymology 4[edit]

Conjugation of the verb polir

Verb[edit]

polo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of polir.