port

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See also: Port, PORT, pórt, port., and Port.

Contents

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

The old port of Dubrovnik

From Old English port, from Latin portus ‎(port, harbour), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pértus ‎(crossing) (and thus distantly cognate with ford).

Noun[edit]

port ‎(plural ports)

Wikipedia

  1. A place on the coast at which ships can shelter, or dock to load and unload cargo or passengers.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Shakespeare, (Please provide the title of the work):
      peering in maps for ports and piers and roads
    • 2013 June 8, “The new masters and commanders”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 52:
      From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much. Those entering it are greeted by wire fences, walls dating back to colonial times and security posts. For mariners leaving the port after lonely nights on the high seas, the delights of the B52 Night Club and Stallion Pub lie a stumble away.
  2. A town or city containing such a place, a port city.
  3. (nautical, uncountable) The left-hand side of a vessel, including aircraft, when one is facing the front. Port does not change based on the orientation of the person aboard the craft.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adjective[edit]

port ‎(not comparable)

  1. (nautical) Of or relating to port, the left-hand side of a vessel.
    on the port side
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

port ‎(third-person singular simple present ports, present participle porting, simple past and past participle ported)

  1. (nautical, transitive, chiefly imperative) To turn or put to the left or larboard side of a ship; said of the helm.
    Port your helm!

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin porta ‎(passage, gate), reinforced in Middle English, from Old French porte.

Noun[edit]

port ‎(plural ports)

  1. (now Scotland, historical) An entryway or gate.
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, book X:
      And whan he cam to the porte of the pavelon, Sir Palomydes seyde an hyghe, ‘Where art thou, Sir Trystram de Lyones?’
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.1:
      Long were it to describe the goodly frame, / And stately port of Castle Joyeous [] .
    • 1623, Shakespeare, Coriolanus, V.vi:
      Him I accuse / The city ports by this hath enter'd
    • 1667, Milton, Paradise Lost, book IV:
      And from their ivory port the Cherubim, / Forth issuing at the accustomed hour
  2. An opening or doorway in the side of a ship, especially for boarding or loading; an embrasure through which a cannon may be discharged; a porthole.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Sir W. Raleigh, (Please provide the title of the work):
      [] her ports being within sixteen inches of the water []
  3. (curling, bowls) A space between two stones wide enough for a delivered stone or bowl to pass through.
  4. An opening where a connection (such as a pipe) is made.
  5. (computing) A logical or physical construct in and from which data are transferred. Wikipedia-logo.png Computer port (hardware) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia:Computer port (hardware)
  6. (computing) A female connector of an electronic device, into which a cable's male connector can be inserted.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old French porter, from Latin portare ‎(carry). Akin to transport, portable.

Verb[edit]

port ‎(third-person singular simple present ports, present participle porting, simple past and past participle ported)

  1. (obsolete) To carry, bear, or transport. See porter.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Fuller, The History of the Worthies of England:
      They are easily ported by boat into other shires.
  2. (military) To hold or carry (a weapon) with both hands so that it lays diagonally across the front of the body, with the barrel or similar part near the left shoulder and the right hand grasping the small of the stock; or, to throw (the weapon) into this position on command.
    Port arms!
    • 1667, Milton, Paradise Lost, book IV:
      [] the angelic squadron...began to hem him round with ported spears.
  3. (computing, video games) To adapt, modify, or create a new version of, a program so that it works on a different platform. Wikipedia-logo.png Porting (computing) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia:Porting
  4. (telephony) To carry or transfer an existing telephone number from one telephone service provider to another.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

port ‎(plural ports)

  1. Something used to carry a thing, especially a frame for wicks in candle-making.
  2. (archaic) The manner in which a person carries himself; bearing; deportment; carriage. See also portance.
    • late 14th c., Chaucer, “General Prologue”, in Canterbury Tales, line 69:
      And of his port as meeke as is a mayde.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.iii:
      Those same with stately grace, and princely port / She taught to tread, when she her selfe would grace []
    • (Can we date this quote?), South, (Please provide the title of the work):
      the necessities of pomp, grandeur, and a suitable port in the world
  3. (military) The position of a weapon when ported; a rifle position executed by throwing the weapon diagonally across the front of the body, with the right hand grasping the small of the stock and the barrel sloping upward and crossing the point of the left shoulder.
  4. (computing) A program that has been adapted, modified, or recoded so that it works on a different platform from the one for which it was created; the act of this adapting.
    Gamers can't wait until a port of the title is released on the new system.
    The latest port of the database software is the worst since we made the changeover.
  5. (computing, BSD) A set of files used to build and install a binary executable file from the source code of an application.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Named from Portuguese Oporto, a city in Portugal from whence the wines were originally shipped.

Noun[edit]

port ‎(plural ports)

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

  1. A type of very sweet fortified wine, mostly dark red, traditionally made in Portugal.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Abbreviation of portmanteau.

Noun[edit]

port ‎(plural ports)

  1. (Australia, Queensland, northern New South Wales and elsewhere, colloquial) A suitcase, particularly a schoolbag.
    • 1964, George Johnston, My Brother Jack:
      No, she just paid up proper-like t' the end of the week, an' orf she went with 'er port, down t' the station, I suppose.
    • 2001, Sally de Dear, The House on Pig Island[1], page 8:
      As they left the classroom, Jennifer pointed at the shelves lining the veranda. “Put your port in there.”
      “What?” asked Penny.
      “Your port - your school bag, silly. It goes in there.”

Albanian[edit]

Noun[edit]

port m (indefinite plural porte, definite singular porti, definite plural portet)

  1. port, harbor

Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Latin

Noun[edit]

port m ‎(plural ports)

  1. port, harbour

Etymology 2[edit]

From portar

Noun[edit]

port m ‎(plural ports)

  1. wearing

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From late Old Norse port, portr, from Latin porta.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /port/, [pʰoɐ̯ˀd̥]

Noun[edit]

port c (singular definite porten, plural indefinite porte)

  1. gate
  2. gateway

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from French port.

Noun[edit]

port m, n ‎(plural porten)

  1. postage

Etymology 2[edit]

Named from Portuguese Oporto, a city in Portugal from whence the wines were originally shipped.

Noun[edit]

port m ‎(uncountable, diminutive portje n)

  1. (a glass of) port, port wine, Porto

Etymology 3[edit]

See porren.

Verb[edit]

port

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of porren
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of porren

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French port, from Latin portus, from Proto-Italic *portus, from Proto-Indo-European *pértus ‎(crossing), from *per- ‎(to go forth, to cross).

Noun[edit]

port m ‎(plural ports)

  1. port, harbour
  2. port, harbour city
  3. refuge
  4. transport
  5. postage
  6. stature, way of carrying oneself

Etymology 2[edit]

Deverbal of porter. Ultimately from the same source as etymology 1 above.

Noun[edit]

port m ‎(plural ports)

  1. wearing (act of wearing something)

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈport]
  • Hyphenation: port

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

port ‎(plural portok)

  1. (computing) port
Declension[edit]
Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative port portok
accusative portot portokat
dative portnak portoknak
instrumental porttal portokkal
causal-final portért portokért
translative porttá portokká
terminative portig portokig
essive-formal portként portokként
essive-modal
inessive portban portokban
superessive porton portokon
adessive portnál portoknál
illative portba portokba
sublative portra portokra
allative porthoz portokhoz
elative portból portokból
delative portról portokról
ablative porttól portoktól
Possessive forms of port
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. portom portjaim
2nd person sing. portod portjaid
3rd person sing. portja portjai
1st person plural portunk portjaink
2nd person plural portotok portjaitok
3rd person plural portjuk portjaik

Etymology 2[edit]

por +‎ -t

Noun[edit]

port

  1. accusative singular of por

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

port n ‎(genitive singular ports, nominative plural port)

  1. gate, gateway, entryway

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish port ‎(tune, melody).

Noun[edit]

port m ‎(genitive singular poirt, nominative plural poirt)

  1. (music) tune
    • Is buaine port ná glór na n-éan; is buaine focal ná toice an tsaoil.
      A tune is more lasting than the song of birds; a word is more lasting than the wealth of the world.
  2. jig (dance)
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish port ‎(bank, shore (of river or sea); landing-place, haven; bank, mound, entrenchment; place, spot, locality; stead, abode; stronghold, fortress), from Latin portus ‎(harbour, port; haven, refuge, asylum, retreat).

Noun[edit]

port m ‎(genitive singular poirt, nominative plural poirt)

  1. landing-place
  2. harbor, port
  3. bank (of river, etc.)
  4. mound, embankment
  5. refuge, haven, resort
  6. stopping-place
  7. place, locality
  8. fortified place, stronghold
  9. occupied place, seat, center
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
port phort bport
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • "port" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • 1 port” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • 2 port” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Ladin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin portus.

Noun[edit]

port m ‎(plural porc)

  1. port, harbour

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin portus ‎(port, harbour).

Noun[edit]

port m ‎(plural ports)

  1. (Jersey) harbour, port

Synonyms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Norwegian portr m, from late Old Norse port n, from Latin porta f.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

port m ‎(definite singular porten, indefinite plural porter, definite plural portene)

  1. a gate
  2. (computing) a port (logical or physical construct in and from which data are transferred).
  3. (computing) A female connector of an electronic device, into which a cable's male connector can be inserted.

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Norwegian portr m, from late Old Norse port n, from Latin porta f.

Noun[edit]

port m ‎(definite singular porten, indefinite plural portar, definite plural portane)

  1. a gate
  2. (computing) a port (logical or physical construct in and from which data are transferred).
  3. (computing) A female connector of an electronic device, into which a cable's male connector can be inserted.

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin portus.

Noun[edit]

port m

  1. portal: a door or gate.
  2. port: a harbor or harbor-town, (chiefly) with special trading privileges.

Derived terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin portus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

port m ‎(oblique plural porz or portz, nominative singular porz or portz, nominative plural port)

  1. port (for watercraft)
    • circa 1150, Turoldus, La Chanson de Roland:
      As porz d'Espaigne en est passet Rollant
      Roland went to the ports of Spain

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

port m inan

  1. port, harbour (area for ships)
  2. port, a town or city containing such a place

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French port, Italian porto, Latin portus.

Noun[edit]

port n ‎(plural porturi)

  1. port (town with port)
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

port

  1. first-person singular present tense form of purta.
  2. first-person singular subjunctive form of purta.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish port ‎(tune, melody).

Noun[edit]

port m ‎(genitive singular puirt, plural puirt or portan)

  1. tune

Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish port ‎(bank, shore (of river or sea); landing-place, haven; bank, mound, entrenchment; place, spot, locality; stead, abode; stronghold, fortress), from Latin portus ‎(harbour, port; haven, refuge, asylum, retreat).

Noun[edit]

port m ‎(genitive singular puirt, plural puirt or portan)

  1. port, harbour
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
port phort
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • 1 port” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • 2 port” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From late Old Norse port n, portr m, from Latin porta f. Computing sense loan-translation from English.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

port c

  1. an entrance (into a building), a gate, a portal, a door, a doorway
  2. (computing) a port (logical or physical construct in and from which data are transferred)

Declension[edit]

Inflection of port 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative port porten portar portarna
Genitive ports portens portars portarnas

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English port.

Noun[edit]

port ‎(definite accusative portu, plural portlar)

  1. (computer hardware, networking) port

Declension[edit]