prex

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From US college slang; from 1828.[1]

Noun[edit]

prex (plural prexes)

  1. (US, college slang) A president, especially of a university.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (president, especially of a university): prexy

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

prex (plural prexes)

  1. Prefix.

References[edit]

  1. ^ prex” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *preḱ- (to request, ask).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

prex f (genitive precis); third declension

  1. prayer; request
  2. entreaty

Declension[edit]

  • The nominative singular, prex, and genitive singular, precis, are unattested in Classical Latin.

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative prex precēs
Genitive precis precum
Dative precī precibus
Accusative precem precēs
Ablative prece precibus
Vocative prex precēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Portuguese: prece
  • English: prayer

References[edit]

  • prex in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • prex in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • prex in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • prex in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to importune with petitions: precibus aliquem fatigare
    • to grant a request: precibus obsequi
    • to be influenced by, to yield to urgent (abject) entreaty: magnis (infimis) precibus moveri
    • to refuse, reject a request: repudiare, aspernari preces alicuius
    • to pray to God: adhibere deo preces
    • to pray: preces facere