prex

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From US college slang; from 1828.[1]

Noun[edit]

prex (plural prexes)

  1. (US, college slang) A president, especially of a university.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (president, especially of a university): prexy

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

prex (plural prexes)

  1. Prefix.

References[edit]

  1. ^ prex” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2017.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *preḱ- (to request, ask).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

prex f (genitive precis); third declension

  1. prayer; request
  2. entreaty

Inflection[edit]

  • The nominative singular, prex, and genitive singular, precis, are unattested in Classical Latin.

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative prex precēs
genitive precis precum
dative precī precibus
accusative precem precēs
ablative prece precibus
vocative prex precēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • prex in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • prex in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “prex”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • prex” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to importune with petitions: precibus aliquem fatigare
    • to grant a request: precibus obsequi
    • to be influenced by, to yield to urgent (abject) entreaty: magnis (infimis) precibus moveri
    • to refuse, reject a request: repudiare, aspernari preces alicuius
    • to pray to God: adhibere deo preces
    • to pray: preces facere