profound

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Late Anglo-Norman profound, from Old French profont, from Latin profundus, from pro + fundus (bottom; foundation).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

profound (comparative more profound, superlative most profound)

  1. Descending far below the surface; opening or reaching to great depth; deep.
  2. Very deep; very serious
  3. Intellectually deep; entering far into subjects; reaching to the bottom of a matter, or of a branch of learning; thorough; as, a profound investigation or treatise; a profound scholar; profound wisdom.
  4. Characterized by intensity; deeply felt; pervading; overmastering; far-reaching; strongly impressed; as, a profound sleep.
  5. Bending low, exhibiting or expressing deep humility; lowly; submissive; as, a profound bow.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Dupp
      What humble gestures! What profound reverence!

Translations[edit]

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Noun[edit]

profound (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) The deep; the sea; the ocean.
    God in the fathomless profound / Hath all this choice commanders drowned. Sandys.
  2. (obsolete) An abyss.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)

Verb[edit]

profound (third-person singular simple present profounds, present participle profounding, simple past and past participle profounded)

  1. (obsolete) To cause to sink deeply; to cause to dive or penetrate far down.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Thomas Browne to this entry?)
  2. (obsolete) To dive deeply; to penetrate.

Related terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

profound m (feminine profounde)

  1. (late Anglo-Norman) Alternative spelling of parfunt.