purport

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English purporten, from Anglo-Norman purporter and Old French porporter (convey, contain, carry), from pur-, from Latin pro (forth) + Old French porter (carry), from Latin portō (carry).

Pronunciation[edit]

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  • (verb, US) IPA(key): /pɚˈpɔɹt/
  • (noun, UK) IPA(key): /ˈpɜːpɔːt/, /ˈpɜːpət/
  • (noun, US) IPA(key): /ˈpɚpɔɹt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)t

Verb[edit]

purport (third-person singular simple present purports, present participle purporting, simple past and past participle purported)

  1. To convey, imply, or profess (often falsely or inaccurately).
    He purports himself to be an international man of affairs.
    • 1962 August, “More W.R. services in jeopardy”, in Modern Railways, page 82, photo caption:
      The intermediate station seen here, Llanbister Road, is 5 hilly miles by road from the town it purports to serve.
  2. (construed with to) To intend.
    He purported to become an international man of affairs.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

purport (plural purports)

  1. import, intention or purpose
  2. (obsolete) disguise; covering

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]