pus

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See also: puss, pūś, and -pus

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pus, meaning the same.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pus ‎(uncountable)

  1. A whitish-yellow or yellow substance composed primarily of dead white blood cells and dead pyogenic bacteria; normally found in regions of bacterial infection.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

pus ‎(third-person singular simple present pusses, present participle pussing, simple past and past participle pussed)

  1. (rare) To emit pus.

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from Latin puteum. Compare Romanian puț, Italian pozzo.

Noun[edit]

pus m

  1. well

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin pus, meaning the same.

Noun[edit]

pus m ‎(uncountable)

  1. pus

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin plūs, from Proto-Indo-European *plē-, *pelu- ‎(many).

Adverb[edit]

pus

  1. more

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin post

Conjunction[edit]

pus

  1. after

French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin pus, meaning the same.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pus m ‎(plural pus)

  1. pus

Etymology 2[edit]

See pouvoir

Verb[edit]

pus

  1. first-person singular past historic of pouvoir
  2. second-person singular past historic of pouvoir

Etymology 3[edit]

See paître

Verb[edit]

pus

  1. (extremely rare) masculine plural of the past participle of paître

External links[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Irish bus ‎(lip).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pus m ‎(genitive singular puis, nominative plural pusa)

  1. (protruding) mouth; sulky expression, pout
  2. (anatomy) snout

Declension[edit]

Alternative declension

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

  • pusach ‎(pouting, in a huff; whimpering, ready to cry, adj)
  • pusaire m, pusaí m, pusaíoch m ‎(sulky person; blubberer, whimperer)
  • puslach m ‎(muzzle)

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
pus phus bpus
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • "pus" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • 4 bus (‘lip’)” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • pus” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pus.

Noun[edit]

pus m ‎(invariable)

  1. pus, matter

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *pu-; compare Sanskrit पूयति ‎(pūyati, stinks, rots), Greek πῦον ‎(pῦon, discharge from a sore), πύθω ‎(pýtho, to rot), Gothic 𐍆𐌿𐌻𐍃 ‎(fuls, foul), Old English fuls ‎(foul) and Latin puteō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pūs n ‎(genitive pūris); third declension

  1. pus
  2. foul, corrupt matter

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative pūs pūrēs
genitive pūris pūrum
dative pūrī pūribus
accusative pūrem pūrēs
ablative pūre pūribus
vocative pūs pūrēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

pus

  1. rafsi of pu'i.

Miskito[edit]

Noun[edit]

pus

  1. cat

Norman[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French plus, from Latin.

Adverb[edit]

pus

  1. (Jersey) more, -er (used to form comparatives of adjectives)

Noun[edit]

pus m ‎(plural pus)

  1. (Jersey, mathematics) plus sign

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

pus

  1. first-person singular preterite of pouver

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Onomatopoeia.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pus m ‎(definite singular pusen, indefinite plural pusar, definite plural pusane)

  1. (informal) cat

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • pu (Mistralian)

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal plus, from Latin plus.

Adverb[edit]

pus

  1. more

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pt

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin pus, from Proto-Indo-European *pu- ‎(to rot, stink).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pus m (uncountable)

  1. pus

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

pus

  1. First-person singular (eu) preterite indicative of pôr
    • 2005, Lya Wyler (translator), J. K. Rowling (English author), Harry Potter e o Enigma do Príncipe (Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince), Rocco, page 234:
      Não pus nada no suco!
      I didn't put anything in the juice!

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Past participle of pune. Probably formed on the basis of the simple perfect, puse, or from a form *post, from Latin postus, from positus. (compare also adăpost, where this was preserved)

Pronunciation[edit]

Participle[edit]

pus

  1. past participle of pune

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pus

Noun[edit]

pus m ‎(plural puses)

  1. pus

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic bus, from Proto-Turkic.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pus ‎(definite accusative pusu, plural puslar)

  1. haze

Declension[edit]


Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin plūs, from Proto-Indo-European *plē-, *pelu- ‎(many).

Adverb[edit]

pus

  1. more