putz

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See also: Putz

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Yiddish פּאָץ(pots, penis, fool). Compare similar semantic developments in futz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

putz (plural putzes)

  1. (slang) Fool, idiot.
  2. (slang) Jerk.
  3. (slang) Penis.
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

putz (third-person singular simple present putzes, present participle putzing, simple past and past participle putzed)

  1. (slang) Waste time.
    Stop putzing around.

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Pennsylvania German Putz; compare German Putz (ornament, decoration, finery), putzen (to clean; decorate). Compare the above.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

putz (plural putzes)

  1. A decoration or ornament in the Nativity tradition, usually placed under a Christmas tree.
    • 1995, Joe L. Wheeler, Christmas in My Heart, Book 4, pages 12-13:
      The American custom of erecting a putz seems to have originated with the Moravians but the custom long ago spread to non-Moravian households. Essentially, the putz is a landscape, built on the floor or on a table or portable platform.

Verb[edit]

putz (third-person singular simple present putzes, present participle putzing, simple past and past participle putzed)

  1. (Pennsylvania Dutch) To go around viewing the putzes in the neighborhood.
    • 1947, Holiday - Volume 2, Issues 1-6, page 86:
      Once all good Moravians in Bethlehem went putzing between Christmas and Twelfth Night to take a look at their friends' cribs.
    • 1978, Mildred Jordan, The Distelfink Country of the Pennsylvania Dutch, page 141:
      Everyone in the Moravian settlements goes putzing, visiting others' works of art.
    • 1985, Richmond E. Myers, Christmas traditions: Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, →ISBN, page 43:
      One Christmas custom that was very much the rage in the last years of the nineteenth century and the early decades of the twentieth, was the putzing party. In the days when there were many putzes built in Bethlehem private homes, it was the practice to organize groups to wander around and visit the families who had erected these wonderful Christmas displays.



Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably an euphemistic form of puta.

Interjection[edit]

putz

  1. (slang) Used to emphasize something that has gone wrong.
    Putz, meu carro quebrou.

Syonyms[edit]