quark

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Quark

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Coined by American physicist Murray Gell-Mann in 1963. The literary connection to James Joyce's Finnegans Wake was asserted later; see the Quark Wikipedia article.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

quark (plural quarks)

  1. (physics) In the Standard Model, an elementary subatomic particle that forms matter. They combine to form hadrons, such as protons and neutrons.
    • 2012 March-April, Jeremy Bernstein, “A Palette of Particles”, in American Scientist[1], volume 100, number 2, page 146:
      There were also particles no one had predicted that just appeared. Five of them […, i]n order of increasing modernity, [] are the neutrino, the pi meson, the antiproton, the quark and the Higgs boson.
  2. (computing, X Window System) An integer that uniquely identifies a text string.
    • 2012, Keith D. Gregory, Programming with Motif (page 453)
      Two functions are provided to convert between strings and quarks: XrmStringToQuark and XrmQuarkToString []
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

German quark.

Borrowed from German Quark, from late Middle High German twarc, from a West Slavic language (compare Polish twaróg), from Proto-Slavic *tvarogъ.

Doublet of tvorog.

Noun[edit]

quark (uncountable)

  1. A soft creamy cheese, eaten throughout northern, central, and eastern Europe, very similar to cottage cheese except that it is usually not made with rennet.
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Onomatopoeic, from the sound of the squawk.

Noun[edit]

quark (plural quarks)

  1. (Falkland Islands, informal) The black-crowned night heron, Nycticorax nycticorax.

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ James Gleick (1993) Genius: Richard Feynman and Modern Physics:
    Gell-Mann won the linguistic battle once again: his choice, a croaking nonsense word, was "quark". (After the fact, he was able to tack on a literary antecedent when he found the phrase "Three quarks for Muster Mark" in Finnegans Wake, but the physicists quark was pronounced from the beginning to rhyme with "cork".)

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English quark.

Noun[edit]

quark m (plural quarks)

  1. (physics) quark

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English quark.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

quark m (plural quarks)

  1. (physics) quark

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English quark.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

quark m (plural quarks)

  1. (physics) quark

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English quark.

Noun[edit]

quark m (plural [please provide])

  1. (physics) quark

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English quark.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkwark/
  • Hyphenation: quàrk

Noun[edit]

quark m (invariable)

  1. (physics) quark

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • quark in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English quark.

Noun[edit]

quark m (plural quarks)

  1. (physics) quark (an elementary subatomic particle which forms matter)
  2. quark (soft creamy cheese)

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English quark.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkwarɡ/, [ˈkwarɣ]

Noun[edit]

quark m (plural quarks)

  1. quark
    Hypernyms: fermión, partícula elemental

Hyponyms[edit]

See also[edit]

  • (fermions) fermión; quark, leptón