quasi-

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See also: quasi

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin quasi (almost, as it were), from quam (interrogative adverb) + (conditional particle).

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

quasi-

  1. Similar to, but not exactly the same as; virtual(ly). [from 17th c.]
    • 1974, Lawrence Durrell, Monsieur, Faber & Faber 1992, p. 18:
      The quasi-death of insanity with its small periodic remissions, its deviations into good sense, even into brilliant insight, was almost more cruel really than outright death.
    • 2020 July 20, Simon Jenkins, “Britain deserves better than an Old Etonian Donald Trump”, in The Guardian[1]:
      The British constitution famously rests on convention. This requires a compact between politicians working as a cabinet and a quasi-independent civil service.

Usage notes[edit]

  • “Quasi-” may be prefixed to nouns, adjectives, and adverbs.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin quasi (as if).

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

quasi-

  1. quasi-

Derived terms[edit]

Note: quasi- should be written connected to the following word, except where the vowels collide, in which case a hyphen is inserted.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin quasi (as if).

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

quasi-

  1. quasi-

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From quasi, from Latin quasi (as if).

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

quasi-

  1. quasi-

Derived terms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

quasi-

  1. quasi-, para-
    Synonyms: niby-, para-

Derived terms[edit]

Category Polish words prefixed with quasi- not found

Further reading[edit]

  • quasi- in Polish dictionaries at PWN