rabi

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: rabí and rabî

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Urdu ربیع(rabī)/Hindi रबी (rabī), from Persian ربیع(rabi'), from Arabic رَبِيع(rabīʿ, spring).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rabi (plural rabis)

  1. (South Asia) Spring. [from 18th c.]
  2. (South Asia) The spring harvest. [from 19th c.]
    • c.1885, A.L.O.E. The Wondrous Sickle:
      ...I made out that he would be here before the rabi harvest is ripe; the corn is green enough yet, but I thought that after work I would come over here to meet him.
    • 1997, Kiran Nagarkar, Cuckold, HarperCollins 2013, p. 120:
      The monsoon had failed at the beginning but picked up very well later, so the rabi crop would be just fine and the wars they mentioned had taken place a year and a half ago.

References[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Emilian[edit]

Noun[edit]

rabi f

  1. plural of ràbia

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German rauben, Polish rabować.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): [ˈrabi]
  • Rhymes: -abi
  • Hyphenation: ra‧bi

Verb[edit]

rabi (present rabas, past rabis, future rabos, conditional rabus, volitive rabu)

  1. (transitive) to take from someone by force or threat, to rob

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

  • rabaĵo (something acquired by robbery)
  • rabinto (robber (one who has committed a robbery))
  • rabisto (robber (one who makes a living by robbery))
  • rabo (a robbery)

Related terms[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Rabbi, ultimately from Hebrew רבי(rabī, my master).

Noun[edit]

rabi (genitive rabi, partitive rabi)

  1. rabbi

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • rabi in Eesti keele seletav sõnaraamat

References[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈrabi]
  • Hyphenation: ra‧bi

Etymology 1[edit]

From Arabic رَبِّي(rabbī, my God).

Noun[edit]

rabi (first-person possessive rabiku, second-person possessive rabimu, third-person possessive rabinya)

  1. my God.

Etymology 2[edit]

From (post-Tanakh) Hebrew רַבִּי(rabbi, my master), from רַב(rav, master [of]) +‎ ־י(-i, me).

Noun[edit]

rabi (plural rabi-rabi, first-person possessive rabiku, second-person possessive rabimu, third-person possessive rabinya)

  1. rabbi, a Jewish scholar or teacher of halacha (Jewish law), capable of making halachic decisions, who is or is qualified to be the leader of a Jewish congregation.

Further reading[edit]


Javanese[edit]

Javanese register set
ꦏꦿꦩꦲꦶꦁꦒꦶꦭ꧀ (krama inggil): garwa putri
ꦏꦿꦩꦔꦺꦴꦏꦺꦴ (krama-ngoko): rabi
ꦔꦺꦴꦏꦺꦴ (ngoko): bojo wadon

Noun[edit]

rabi

  1. (dialectal) wife

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

rabi

  1. Alternative form of raby

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Verb[edit]

rabi (Cyrillic spelling раби)

  1. inflection of rabiti:
    1. third-person singular present
    2. second-person singular imperative

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin rabbi, from Ancient Greek ῥαββί (rhabbí), from Hebrew רַבִּי(rabbî).

Noun[edit]

rabi m (plural rabiniaid or rabïaid, not mutable)

  1. (Judaism) rabbi