rapprochement

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French rapprochement (act or process of getting closer together; link (between two things)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rapprochement (plural rapprochements)

  1. The reestablishment of cordial relations, particularly between two countries; a reconciliation.
    It was the Nixon administration that saw the rapprochement between the United States and China.
    • 1869 December 11, “The Changes in the Government of France (Die Neue Freie Presse—Vienna, Nov. 30.)”, in Public Opinion: A Comprehensive Summary of the Press throughout the World on All Important Current Topics, volume XVI, number 429, London: Printed by Charles Wyman, [] and published, for the proprietors, by Isaac Seaman, [], OCLC 173418495, page 738, column 2:
      The inauguration of a liberal order of things, a rapprochement of the [First French] Empire with constitutionalism and Parliamentary government, had been expected from the Speech from the Throne now just given. This expectation is completely disappointed by the speech. …
    • 1892 February, James Sulley, “Is Man the Only Reasoner?”, in The Popular Science Monthly, volume XL, New York, N.Y.: Popular Science Pub. Co., OCLC 1762662, page 506:
      Not forever, however, was the animal world to suffer this indignity at the hands of man. Thinkers themselves prepared the way for a rapprochement between the two. More particularly the English philosophers from [John] Locke onward, together with their French followers, [] may be said by a sort of leveling-down process to have favored the idea of a mental kinship between man and brute.
    • 1926 December 2, “‘No victors’ if European war starts: French foreign policy: China and Italy”, in The Daily Examiner, volume 18, number 2721 (New Series), Grafton, N.S.W.: Printed and published by William Frederick Blood, of Grafton, for the Daily Examiner, Limited, [...], OCLC 920432055, page 5:
      M. [Aristide] Briand, in a statement on the French foreign policy said a lasting European peace was impossible without a Franco-German rapprochement.
    • 1940 January, “Italy’s Living Room”, in The Living Age, volume 357, number 4480, New York, N.Y.: The Living Age Company Inc., OCLC 1011870584, section II (Eyes to the Balkans: Translated from Europe Nouvelle, Paris Political and Literary Weekly), page 475, column 1:
      Attempts at a Hungarian–Yugoslavian rapprochement are not a recent matter, and Italy has always approved of them. But in the past these attempts had been made with the idea of breaking up the Little Entente and isolating Yugoslavia.
    • 1989, David Boucher, “The New Leviathan in Context”, in The Social and Political Thought of R. G. Collingwood, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 27:
      Further, I argue that [Robin George] Collingwood's final work is in fact the culmination of his persistent endeavour to bring about rapprochements between philosophy and history, and between theory and practice.
    • 2018 June 4, Dominique Mosbergen, “Another Summit Snafu: Who’s Going to Pay for Kim Jong Un’s Singapore Hotel Room?: The U.S., Singapore and an Anti-nuke Organization have All Reportedly Offered to Help Foot the Bill”, in HuffPost[1]:
      During the recent Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, for instance, the South Korean government earmarked about $2.6 million to cover the travel expenses of members of the North’s visiting delegation, [] “These norms were laid in the early 2000s, when Seoul’s so-called sunshine policy took off,” Sung-Yoon Lee, a Korea expert at Tufts University, told The Washington Post last week, referring to a rapprochement policy adopted by South Korea. “North Korea can build nukes and ICBMs, but claim they are too poor to pay for foreign travel costs.”

Alternate forms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

rapprocher (to near, to approach) +‎ -ment

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʁa.pʁɔʃ.mɑ̃/
  • (file)
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

rapprochement m (plural rapprochements)

  1. act or process of getting closer, nearer together
  2. link (between two things)

Further reading[edit]