receptor

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English receptour, from Old French receptour or Latin receptor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

receptor (plural receptors)

  1. (obsolete) One who receives something or someone; in particular, one who harbors a fugitive.
    Coordinate terms: receiptor, resetter
    • 1585, Fleetwood, in 1824, Henry Ellis, Original letters, illustrative of English history, page 297:
      [] fewe that were there did spend the same daie abowte the searchinge out of sundrye that were receptors of ffelons, where we fownd a greate manye aswell in London, Westminster, Sowthwarke, as in all other places abowte the same.
    • 1609, William Barlow, Answer to a nameless Catholic's censure, page 13:
      The kind Receptors of the Fugitiues after the Detection.
    • 1660, Virginia statue, in 1809, Virginia, The Statutes at Large, page 538:
      An act [] Against pyrats, their assistors or abettors, out-traidors or receptors, against breakers of the admirall's arrestments and attachments against goods forbidden,
  2. (biochemistry, medicine) A protein on a cell wall that binds with specific molecules so that they can be absorbed into the cell in order to control certain functions.
    • 2001, Leslie Iversen, Drugs: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford 2001), page 24:
      In the target organ, the drug is recognised by ‘receptors’. These are large molecules, usually proteins, to which the drug binds tightly and with a high degree of specificity.
  3. (biology) Any specialized cell or structure that responds to sensory stimuli.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin receptorius.

Adjective[edit]

receptor (feminine receptora, masculine plural receptors, feminine plural receptores)

  1. receptive

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Latin receptor.

Noun[edit]

receptor m (plural receptors)

  1. receptor

Related terms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English receptor, from Old French receptour, from Latin receptor.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /rɛˈt͡sɛp.tɔr/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛptɔr
  • Syllabification: re‧cep‧tor

Noun[edit]

receptor m pers

  1. (biochemistry, medicine) sensory receptor (protein on a cell wall that responds to sensory stimuli)
  2. (biology) receptor (any specialized cell or structure that responds to sensory stimuli)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective
noun

Further reading[edit]

  • receptor in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • receptor in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

receptor (feminine receptora, masculine plural receptores, feminine plural receptoras)

  1. Brazilian Portuguese standard spelling of recetor.

Noun[edit]

receptor m (plural receptores, feminine receptora, feminine plural receptoras)

  1. Brazilian Portuguese standard spelling of recetor.

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French récepteur.

Adjective[edit]

receptor m or n (feminine singular receptoare, masculine plural receptori, feminine and neuter plural receptoare)

  1. receiving

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

receptor n (plural receptoare)

  1. receiver

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

receptor m (plural receptori)

  1. (medicine) receptor

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin receptorius.

Adjective[edit]

receptor (feminine receptora, masculine plural receptores, feminine plural receptoras)

  1. receiving

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Latin receptorius.

Noun[edit]

receptor m (plural receptores)

  1. receiver, receptor, recipient
  2. (baseball) catcher
Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]