reed

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See also: Reed

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English rede, from Old English hrēod, from Proto-Germanic *hreudą, of uncertain origin. Akin to Saterland Frisian Rait (reed), West Frisian reid (reed), Dutch riet (reed), German Ried (reed). No cognates in North Germanic languages, but the existence of an otherwise unattested Gothic *𐌷𐍂𐌹𐌿𐌳 (*hriud) was supposed by the brothers Grimm.[1] They also theorised that the word may have a relation to the retas mentioned in Noctes Atticae (Aulus Gellius).[1] The measuring reed sense is the translation of Akkadian qanûm ("cane") used in the Bible and elsewhere.[2]

Noun[edit]

reed (countable and uncountable, plural reeds)

  1. (countable) Any of various types of tall stiff perennial grass-like plants growing together in groups near water.
  2. (countable) The hollow stem of these plants.
  3. (countable, music) Part of the mouthpiece of certain woodwind instruments, comprising a thin piece of wood or metal which shakes very quickly to produce sound when a musician blows over it.
  4. (countable, music) A musical instrument such as the clarinet or oboe, which produces sound when a musician blows on the reed.
  5. (countable, weaving) A comb-like part of a beater for beating the weft when weaving.
  6. (countable, historical) A piece of whalebone or similar for stiffening the skirt or waist of a woman's dress.
  7. (uncountable, architecture) Reeding.
  8. (mining) A tube containing the train of powder for igniting the charge in blasting.
  9. Straw prepared for thatching a roof.
  10. (poetic, obsolete) A missile weapon.
  11. (archaic, metrology) A measuring rod.
    1. A Babylonian unit of measure the length of a reed, equal to half a nindan, or six cubits.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

reed (third-person singular simple present reeds, present participle reeding, simple past and past participle reeded)

  1. (transitive) To thatch.
  2. To mill or mint with reeding.

Etymology 2[edit]

See ree

Verb[edit]

reed

  1. simple past tense and past participle of ree

Etymology 3[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

reed (plural reeds)

  1. (Britain, Scotland, dialectal) The fourth stomach of a ruminant; rennet.

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 The supposition about Gothic and the quote from Noctes Atticae in Deutsches Wörterbuch: "dixit ... amicus meus in libro se Gavi de origine vocabulorum VII legisse "retas" vocari arbores, quae aut ripis fluminum eminerent aut in alveis eorum exstarent"
  2. ^ Jens Høyrup, Lengths, Widths, Surfaces: A Portrait of Old Babylonian Algebra and Its Kin, p. 209, Springer, 2002 →ISBN.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

reed

  1. singular past indicative of rijden

Pronunciation 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

reed

  1. first-person singular present indicative of reden
  2. imperative of reden

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

reed

  1. (Chaucer) advice, counsel

Adjective[edit]

reed

  1. red
    • 14th c., Chaucer, General Prologue
      Boold was hir face, and fair, and reed of hewe.
      Bold was her face, and fair, and red of hue.

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

reed c (plural redens, diminutive reedsje)

  1. skate
Further reading[edit]
  • reed (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Frisian *rēd, from Proto-Germanic *raidō.

Noun[edit]

reed c (plural reden, diminutive reedsje)

  1. driveway
  2. journey
Further reading[edit]
  • reed (II)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011