rein

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Anglo-Norman reyne, from Old French resne (Modern French rêne), from Vulgar Latin *retina, from Classical Latin retineō ‎(to retain), from re- + teneō.

Noun[edit]

rein ‎(plural reins)

  1. A strap or rope attached to the bridle or bit, used to control a horse, animal or young child.
  2. (figuratively) An instrument or means of curbing, restraining, or governing.
    • Milton
      Let their eyes rove without rein.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

rein ‎(third-person singular simple present reins, present participle reining, simple past and past participle reined)

  1. To direct or stop a horse by using reins.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Chapman
      He mounts and reins his horse.
  2. To restrain; to control; to check.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare
      Being once chafed, he cannot / Be reined again to temperance.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Anglo-Norman reines, Middle French reins, and their source, Latin rēnēs.

Noun[edit]

rein ‎(plural reins)

  1. (now rare, archaic, chiefly in plural) A kidney.
  2. The inward impulses; the affections and passions, formerly supposed to be located in the area of the kidneys.
    • Bible, Proverbs xxiii. 16
      My reins rejoice, when thy lips speak right things.
    • Bible, Revelations ii. 23
      I am he which searcheth the reins and hearts.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch reini, rēni, from Proto-Germanic *hrainiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rein ‎(comparative reiner, superlative reinst)

  1. (formal) clean, spotless
  2. pure, sheer

Declension[edit]

Inflection of rein
uninflected rein
inflected reine
comparative reiner
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial rein reiner het reinst
het reinste
indefinite m./f. sing. reine reinere reinste
n. sing. rein reiner reinste
plural reine reinere reinste
definite reine reinere reinste
partitive reins reiners

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

rein

  1. Instructive plural form of reki.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ren.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rein m ‎(plural reins)

  1. (anatomy) kidney
  2. (in the plural) small of the back, waist

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old High German reini, from Proto-Germanic *hrainiz, a suffixed form of Proto-Indo-European *(s)keri-. Cognate with Old Saxon hreni (Low German ren), Dutch rein, Old Norse hreinn (Swedish ren); and with Ancient Greek χρίνειν ‎(khrínein), Old Irish criathar. More remotely related to English riddle ‎(sieve).

Adjective[edit]

rein ‎(comparative reiner, superlative am reinsten)

  1. pure, clear, plain
    • 2010, Der Spiegel, issue 24/2010, page 131:
      Natürlich ist eine Weltmeisterschaft kein reines Sportevent mehr, sie ist sicher auch ein bisschen Welt- und Entwicklungspolitik.
      Of course, a world championship is no longer a pure sports event, it surely is also a bit of world and development politics.
Declension[edit]

Adverb[edit]

rein

  1. purely
    Unsere Beziehung ist rein platonisch.
    Our relationship is purely platonic.

Etymology 2[edit]

Contraction of herein ‎(in here) or hinein ‎(in there).

Adverb[edit]

rein

  1. (colloquial) inside, in here
    Er kommt jetzt rein. ― He's coming inside now.
  2. (colloquial) inside, in there
    Er geht rein zu den andern. ― He's going inside to the other people.
Usage notes[edit]

Unlike the standard language, colloquial German does not distinguish the meanings of hinein ‎(in there (away from the speaker) and herein ‎(in here towards the speaker). Rein is used for both meanings.

Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rein f ‎(genitive singular reinar, nominative plural reinar)

  1. a strip (of land)

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Noun[edit]

rein m (plural reins)

  1. (anatomy) kidney

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin rēn.

Noun[edit]

rein m ‎(plural reins)

  1. (Jersey, anatomy) kidney

Related terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hreinn

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rein ‎(neuter singular reint, definite singular and plural reine, comparative reinere, indefinite superlative reinest, definite superlative reineste)

  1. clean
  2. pure

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse hreinn

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Noun[edit]

rein m ‎(definite singular reinen, indefinite plural reiner, definite plural reinene)

  1. a reindeer
Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hreinn

Adjective[edit]

rein ‎(neuter singular reint, definite singular and plural reine, comparative reinare, indefinite superlative reinast, definite superlative reinaste)

  1. clean
  2. pure

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse hreinn

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

Noun[edit]

rein m ‎(definite singular reinen, indefinite plural reinar, definite plural reinane)

  1. a reindeer
Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

rein m ‎(oblique plural reinz, nominative singular reinz, nominative plural rein)

  1. (anatomy) kidney

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

rein ‎(plural reins)

  1. rain

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian, from Proto-Germanic *regnaz. Compare English rain, Low German Ręgen, Dutch regen, German Regen, Danish regn.

Noun[edit]

rein

  1. rain