reprobate

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin reprobatus (disapproved, rejected, condemned), past participle of reprobare.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɛpɹəbət/
    • (file)

Adjective[edit]

reprobate (comparative more reprobate, superlative most reprobate)

  1. (rare) Rejected; cast off as worthless.
  2. Rejected by God; damned, sinful.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book I”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker [] [a]nd by Robert Boulter [] [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554, lines 696–7:
      Strength and Art are easily out-done / By Spirits reprobate
  3. Immoral, having no religious or principled character.
    The reprobate criminal sneered at me.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 1”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker [] [a]nd by Robert Boulter [] [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      And strength, and art, are easily outdone / By spirits reprobate.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

reprobate (plural reprobates)

  1. One rejected by God; a sinful person.
  2. An individual with low morals or principles.
    • (Can we date this quote by Sir Walter Raleigh and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      I acknowledge myself for a reprobate, a villain, a traitor to the king.
    • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, Bulldog Drummond Chapter 1
      "Good morning, Mrs. Denny," he said. "Wherefore this worried look on your face? Has that reprobate James been misbehaving himself?"
    • 2012, Andrew Martin, Underground Overground: A passenger's history of the Tube, Profile Books, →ISBN, page 50, on the Hammersmith & City line:
      West of here, it ascends to its viaduct where, 20 feet above the ground, the Westway seeks to emulate it; two scruffy reprobates shouldering their way through a not very pretty streetscape; the one a railway built by corporate buccaneers, the other a road constructed as part of a discredited plan to girdle London with motorways.
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Latin reprobare, reprobatus. Doublet of reprove.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

reprobate (third-person singular simple present reprobates, present participle reprobating, simple past and past participle reprobated)

  1. To have strong disapproval of something; to condemn.
  2. Of God: to abandon or reject, to deny eternal bliss.
  3. To refuse, set aside.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

reprobāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of reprobō