rochet

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See also: röchet

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A group of canons wearing white rochets under black mozzettas.

Middle English roket, rochet, from Anglo-Norman rochet, Middle French rochet, from Frankish (cf. Old English rocc (overgarment)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rochet (plural rochets)

  1. A white vestment, worn by a bishop, similar to a surplice but with narrower sleeves, extending either to below the knee (in the Catholic church) or to the hem of the cassock in the Anglican church. [from 12th c.]
    • 1600, Edward Fairfax, The Jerusalem Delivered of Tasso, XI, iv:
      Each priest adorn'd was in a surplice white, / The bishops don'd their albes and copes of state, // Above their rochets button'd fair before, / And mitres on their heads like crowns they wore.
    • 1790, Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France:
      They will tell you that they see no difference between an idler with a hat and national cockade, and an idler in a cowl or in a rochet.
  2. (now rare, historical) A frock or outer garment worn in the 13th and 14th centuries. [from 14th c.]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English roget, from Middle French rouget.

Noun[edit]

rochet (plural rochets)

  1. (obsolete) The red gurnard. [14th–19th c.]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

rochet

  1. genitive plural of rocheta

French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old French rochet, ultimately from Frankish *hrokk.

Noun[edit]

rochet m (plural rochets)

  1. rochet

Etymology 2[edit]

From Frankish *rokko, perhaps under influence of Etymology 1, above.

Noun[edit]

rochet m (plural rochets)

  1. ratchet

Descendants[edit]

  • English: ratchet

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

rochet

  1. Alternative form of roget