rochet

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See also: röchet

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English roket, rochet.

Noun[edit]

rochet (plural rochets)

A group of canons wearing white rochets under black mozzettas.
  1. A white vestment, worn by a bishop, similar to a surplice but with narrower sleeves, extending either to below the knee (in the Catholic church) or to the hem of the cassock in the Anglican church.
    • 1600, Edward Fairfax, The Jerusalem Delivered of Tasso, XI, iv:
      Each priest adorn'd was in a surplice white, / The bishops don'd their albes and copes of state, // Above their rochets button'd fair before, / And mitres on their heads like crowns they wore.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Edmund Burke
      They see no difference between an idler with a hat and national cockade, and an idler in a cowl or in a rochet.
  2. (historical) A frock or outer garment worn in the 13th and 14th centuries.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English roget, from Middle French rouget.

Noun[edit]

rochet (plural rochets)

  1. A fish, the red gurnard.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for rochet in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

rochet

  1. genitive plural of rocheta

French[edit]

Noun[edit]

rochet m (plural rochets)

  1. ratchet

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

rochet

  1. Alternative form of roget