romance

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Romance, românce, and romancé

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English romauns, roumance, from Anglo-Norman and Old French romanz, romans (the vernacular language of France, as opposed to Latin), from Medieval Latin rōmānicē, Vulgar Latin rōmānicē ‎(in the Roman language, adv), from rōmānicus ‎(roman, adj) from rōmānus ‎(a Roman).

Noun[edit]

romance ‎(plural romances)

  1. An intimate relationship between two people; a love affair.
  2. A strong obsession or attachment for something or someone.
  3. Idealized love which is pure or beautiful.
  4. A mysterious, exciting, or fascinating quality.
  5. A story or novel dealing with idealized love.
  6. An embellished account of something; an idealized lie.
  7. A story relating to chivalry; a story involving knights, heroes, adventures, quests, etc.
  8. An adventure, or series of extraordinary events, resembling those narrated in romances.
    His life was a romance.
  9. A dreamy, imaginative habit of mind; a disposition to ignore what is real.
    a girl full of romance
  10. (music) A romanza, or sentimental ballad.

Antonyms[edit]

Quotations[edit]

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

romance ‎(third-person singular simple present romances, present participle romancing, simple past and past participle romanced)

  1. Woo; court.
  2. (intransitive) To write or tell romantic stories, poetry, letters, etc.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Noun[edit]

romance f ‎(plural romances)

  1. ballad, love song

Verb[edit]

romance

  1. first-person singular present indicative of romancer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of romancer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of romancer
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of romancer
  5. second-person singular imperative of romancer

Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

romance ‎(comparative plus romance, superlative le plus romance)

  1. Romance

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal romans, from Medieval Latin, Late Latin rōmānicē ‎(in a Roman manner), from Latin rōmānicus ‎(Roman), from rōmānus ‎(Roman), from Rōma ‎(Rome).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

romance m (plural romances)

  1. (literature) novel (work of prose fiction)
  2. romance; love affair

Synonyms[edit]

  • (love affair): caso

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

romance m, f ‎(plural romances, not comparable)

  1. (linguistics) Romance (of the languages derived from Latin)

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal romans, from Vulgar Latin *romanĭce, compare Medieval Latin rōmānice, ultimately from Latin rōmānicus < rōmānus. Cognates include Old French romanz, whence the modern French noun roman ‎(novel).[1]

Adjective[edit]

romance m, f ‎(plural romances)

  1. Romance

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

romance m ‎(plural romances)

  1. romance, love affair
  2. novel
  3. Spanish (language)

Synonyms[edit]

Verb[edit]

romance

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of romanzar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of romanzar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of romanzar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of romanzar.

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1964, Albert Dauzat; Jean Dubois, Henri Mitterand, “romance”, in Nouveau dictionnaire étymologique (in French), Paris: Librairie Larousse: